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I have an already initialized git repo that I added a .gitignore file to, how can I refresh the file index so the files I want ignored get ignored?

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16 Answers 16

up vote 1370 down vote accepted

(Adding PageTribe's answer to this one, because I think I'm updating the wiki, and this seems useful. If I'm completely mistaken, my apologies.)

To untrack a file that has already been added/initialized to your repository, i.e., stop tracking the file but not delete it from your system use: git rm --cached filename

(Original answer follows. It applies to a larger scenario.)

First commit any outstanding code changes, and then, run this command:

git rm -r --cached .

This removes any changed files from the index(staging area), then just run:

git add .

Commit it:

git commit -m ".gitignore is now working"
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131  
be aware to commit all your changes before, otherwise you will loose control on all the changed files –  Hoang Pham Jan 13 '10 at 14:48
21  
didn't work for me –  Travis Webb Sep 27 '11 at 21:04
5  
@TravisWebb You would have to make sure you set up .gitignore first. Also I tend not to remove all files from the index, only the ones I need to by using Fileglobs such as *.o –  Jason S Dec 27 '11 at 20:41
7  
@trobrock can you please edit your answer to contain a commit at the very beginning ? thks in advance. –  MEM Jul 23 '12 at 10:38
29  
Great answer but git rm --cached filename seems a little less drastic imho.. –  Jim Morrison Oct 21 '13 at 20:37

To untrack a file that has already been added/initialized to your repository, ie stop tracking the file but not delete it from your system use: git rm --cached filename

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7  
This was the perfect way to remove the couple of files I'd added, committed, but later realized didn't need to be tracked. After adding those files to .gitignore, I was able to do this and untrack them perfectly. –  Andrew Larned Apr 8 '11 at 16:17
4  
Tip: for example if you add *.config to your .gitignore, you can do git rm --cached *.config to stop tracking all *.config files. –  dav_i Mar 6 '13 at 13:30
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Also note doing this will delete the files from other repos you push to, even though it stays on your system. If you're just ignoring changes to files and don't want to delete them from other user's repos try using git update-index --assume-unchanged file.name –  dav_i Mar 8 '13 at 10:15
2  
Less magic here than in previous anwser. Thanks. –  Olga Jun 18 '13 at 21:01
    
IMO, this is the correct answer. Wiki answer works-kinda, but is awfully heavy-handed, especially given the question. (I'd fix the wiki, but I'm not sure how. "Soon!" ;) –  Olie Jul 17 at 3:20

If you are trying to ignore changes to a file that's already tracked in the repository (e.g. a dev.properties file that you would need to change for your local environment but you would never want to check in these changes) than what you want to do is:

git update-index --assume-unchanged <file>

If you wanna start tracking changes again

git update-index --no-assume-unchanged <file>

See git-update-index(1) Manual Page.

Also have a look at the skip-worktree and no-skip-worktree options for update-index if you need this to persist past a git-reset (via)


Update: Since people have been asking, here's a convenient (and updated since commented on below) alias for seeing which files are currently "ignored" (--assume-unchanged) in your local workspace

$ git config --global alias.ignored = !git ls-files -v | grep "^[[:lower:]]"
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2  
This is genius! Brilliantly useful. Do you know if there's a way to get a list of all the 'on hold' files? –  artfulrobot Feb 5 '13 at 13:06
8  
This'll work for you: git ls-files -v If the character printed is lower-case, the file is marked assume-unchanged. see: stackoverflow.com/a/2363495/677381 and: git-scm.com/docs/git-ls-files –  dyodji Feb 6 '13 at 1:33
    
This only works as long as one of your remotes doesn't have a change to that file that conflicts with what you have. –  Shauna May 3 '13 at 14:36
    
If you need to integrate a change, from outside your local, to files to which you've assume-unchanged you can always assume-changed, stash, pull/merge, stash pop and assume-unchanged again.... it's not uncommon to add a property, for example, that each local would want to retrieve this way.... but this is really for files where changes most likely WILL conflict... e.g. usernames or local paths... that's the point really. –  dyodji May 4 '13 at 0:01
    
@dyodji Does this only affect myself? Or all users? –  wisbucky Sep 26 '13 at 23:35

Yes - .gitignore system only ignores files not currently under version control from git. I.e. if you've already added a file called test.txt using git-add, then adding test.txt to .gitignore will still cause changes to test.txt to be tracked. You would have to git-rm test.txt first, commit that change. Only then will changes to test.txt be ignored.

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4  
This isn't entirely true, it is possible to ignore changes in a tracked file... see my answer: stackoverflow.com/a/11366713/677381 –  dyodji Jan 3 '13 at 22:08

Remove trailing whitespace in .gitignore

Also, make sure you have no trailing whitespace in your .gitignore. I got to this question because I was searching for an answer, then I had a funny feeling I should open the editor instead of just cat'ing .gitignore. Removed a single extra space from the end and poof it works now :)

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2  
I had exactly the same problem, :P. I also got to this question because of that. Good thing you have this documented here. +1 –  Hindol Jul 11 '12 at 5:08
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If like me you use vi to quickly edit .gitignore use ':set list' to show whitespace. –  Sam Giles Mar 12 '13 at 16:35
    
This happenened to me when I did a echo node_modules >> .gitignore (at least on windows) –  Khôi May 3 at 20:16

i followed these steps

git rm -r --cached .
git add .
git reset HEAD

after that, git delete all files (*.swp in my case) that should be ignoring.

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another problem I had was I placed an inline comment.

tmp/*   # ignore my tmp folder (this doesn't work)

this works

# ignore my tmp folder
tmp/
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Not knowing quite what the 'answer' command did, I ran it, much to my dismay. It recursively removes every file from your git repo.

Stackoverflow to the rescue... How to revert a "git rm -r ."?

git reset HEAD

Did the trick, since I had uncommitted local files that I didn't want to overwrite.

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The git rm -r --cached . didn't work for me. Git was still claiming an my textmate project file was not being tracked even though .tmproj is in my global ignore file. Resetting my local repro like this worked, though. Actually I added the 'hard' option as in git reset --hard HEAD. That should have nearly the same effect in this case. –  IAmNaN May 16 '12 at 19:33
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Be careful with the --hard flag. It will throw out any uncommitted changes without a warning! –  Mikko Rantalainen Mar 1 '13 at 13:02

If the files are already in version control you need to remove them manually.

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1  
I tried git rm --cached and git reset HEAD both tools I'm fairly familiar with and just could get it from the repo. Success came from first rm --cached, then actually manually deleting it, committing the delete, then recreating it manually. And it's gone. –  doublejosh Apr 17 '12 at 23:17
    
This worked for me like so: rm foo/bar && git add -u && git commit -m "removed foo/bar" && git push. Then running touch foo/bar && git status will show the file is now properly ignored. –  AWrightIV Feb 21 at 3:03

Thanks to your answer, I was able to write this little one-liner to improve it. I ran it on my .gitignore and repo, and had no issues, but if anybody sees any glaring problems, please comment. This should git rm -r --cached from .gitignore:

cat $(git rev-parse --show-toplevel)/.gitIgnore | sed "s//$//" | grep -v "^#" | xargs -L 1 -I {} find $(git rev-parse --show-toplevel) -name "{}" | xargs -L 1 git rm -r --cached

Note that you'll get a lot of fatal: pathspec '<pathspec>' did not match any files. That's just for the files which haven't been modified.

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I have found a weird problem with .gitignore. Everything was in place and seemed correct. The only reason why my .gitignore was "ignored" was, that the line-ending was in Mac-Format (\r). So after saving the file with the correct line-ending (in vi using :set ff=unix) everything worked like a charm!

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It just happend on my mac! –  AZ. Sep 26 '12 at 3:36
    
If anyone has problems with .gitignore after creating the file in windows notepad, there is more information here: stackoverflow.com/questions/11451535/gitignore-not-working/… –  Matt Parkins Dec 4 '12 at 11:16
    
The .gitignore format is each line is either a comment (starting with a #) or the whole line (including any whitespace) is full filename pattern. If you have \r mixed into the line, git will ignore only files that end up with \r (you can create those if you want!). See man gitignore for details, it's worth reading. –  Mikko Rantalainen Mar 1 '13 at 13:05

There is another suggestion maybe for those who are as stupid as me! Put the .gitignore file into your repository root not in .git folder. Cheers!

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On my server linux server (not true on my local dev mac), directories are ignored as long as I don't add an asterisk:

www/archives/*

I don't know why but it made me loose a couple of hours, so I wanted to share...

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If you want to stop tracking file without deleting the file from your local system, which I prefer for ignoring config/database.yml file. Simply try:

git rm --cached config/database.yml
# this will delete your file from git history but not from your local system.

now, add this file to .gitignore file and commit the changes. And from now on, any changes made to config/database.yml will not get tracked by git.

Thanks

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To remove just a few specific files from being tracked:

git update-index --assume-unchanged path/to/file

If ever you want to start tracking it again:

git update-index --no-assume-unchanged path/to/file                      
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One other problem not mentioned here is if you've created your .gitignore in Windows notepad it can look like gibberish on other platforms as I found out. The key is to make sure you the encoding is set to ANSI in notepad, (or make the file on linux as I did).

From my answer here: http://stackoverflow.com/a/11451916/406592

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protected by Neal Jul 6 '12 at 17:10

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