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I am trying to extract text from a file according a given date range. The date range will be decided by the user but here I am just using a fixed range.

File content after using grep are as follows:

ronnie@ronnie:~$ zgrep added new.txt
Jul 02 21:03 : update: added Linkin Park/Living Things(2012)/02 - Linkin Park - In My Remains.mp3
Jul 02 21:03 : update: added Linkin Park/Living Things(2012)/03 - Linkin Park - Burn It Down.mp3
Jul 07 10:33 : update: added Linkin Park/Living Things(2012)/04 - Linkin Park - Lies Greed Misery.mp3    
Jul 09 07:54 : update: added Linkin Park/Living Things(2012)/04 - Linkin Park - Lies Greed Misery.mp3

Now, lets suppose I want to extract the text between date Jul 07 and Jul 09. So I used the below command for that

zgrep added new.txt | sed '/"Jul 09"/,/"Jul 07"/p'

which gave me the following output

Jul 02 21:03 : update: added Linkin Park/Living Things(2012)/02 - Linkin Park - In My Remains.mp3
Jul 02 21:03 : update: added Linkin Park/Living Things(2012)/03 - Linkin Park - Burn It Down.mp3
Jul 07 10:33 : update: added Linkin Park/Living Things(2012)/04 - Linkin Park - Lies Greed Misery.mp3
Jul 09 07:54 : update: added Linkin Park/Living Things(2012)/04 - Linkin Park - Lies Greed Misery.mp3

So, as you can see it didn't considered the range i gave to sed.

My question is what should be the correct way to extract text according to a date range.

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Are the lines guaranteed to be ordered by date/time? –  Sorpigal Jul 9 '12 at 14:59
    
@Sorpigal: yes it is ordered by date/time. Actually the file I showed is just a shortened version of /var/log/mpd.log. –  ronnie Jul 9 '12 at 15:03
    
I think grep may be more appropriate if your trying to get just the dates –  DrinkJavaCodeJava Jul 9 '12 at 15:05
2  
See my answer on Server Fault. In your attempt in your question, the double quotes are taken literally, but they are not present in the input file. You don't have -n to suppress printing non-matching lines. I'm pretty sure you need to specify the range delimiters in the order they appear in the file (Jul 7 then Jul 9). –  Dennis Williamson Jul 9 '12 at 15:05
1  
@ronnie: That's because it's still looking for "Jul 08" when it reaches the end of the file. I was confused because I failed to notice that you had changed from "Jul 09" in your question to "Jul 08" in your comment. There's no robust way to get sed to do this because it has no concept of dates. –  Dennis Williamson Jul 9 '12 at 16:54

2 Answers 2

For ordered input,

command | sed -n '/^Jul 07/,/^Jul 09/p' inputFile

is sufficient.

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@ronnie: did you add -n option ? –  Prince John Wesley Jul 9 '12 at 15:05

You're pretty close, what you want is this:

zgrep added new.txt | sed -n -e '/Jul 09/,/Jul 07/p'

Changes were:

  • added -n, which means lines won't be printed unless you specifically say to with p
  • added -e, just for clarity
  • removed your double quotes around the strings. These are not needed because the expression is already enclosed in single quotes and the double quotes do not appear in your file.

Note that this, and your version, will only work if the lines are always ordered by date/time in the first place.

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Your solution works but it only shows the entry with date jul 09 and it doesn't show's the one with jul 07. –  ronnie Jul 9 '12 at 15:08
1  
As @dennis mentioned that we need to specify the range delimiters in the order they appear in the file (Jul 7 then Jul 9). –  ronnie Jul 9 '12 at 15:14

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