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Assume we have millions of addresses based on 2 models.

  1. Address model has plain string properties, even for common properties like county:

    class Address(ndb.Model):
    
      house_no = ndb.StringProperty()
      street = ndb.StringProperty()
      locality = ndb.StringProperty() # City/town
      county = ndb.StringProperty()
      zipcode = ndb.StringProperty()
    
  2. StructuredAddress model keeps the more common properties as references to other models by defining each as a KeyProperty:

    class StructuredAddress(ndb.Model):
    
      house_no = ndb.StringProperty()
      street = ndb.StringProperty()
      locality = ndb.KeyProperty(kind=Locality) # City/town
      county = ndb.KeyProperty(kind=County)
      zipcode = ndb.KeyProperty(kind=Zipcode)
    

Here are the questions:

  • Which model is more efficient when querying based on common properties like zipcode?

  • Assume the case where the number of county properties is about 50, while the number of zipcode properties is about millions. Given millions of address records, which model would be more efficient in this case?

  • Does using KeyProperty in this example mean more read ops, and effectively higher bills? Would built-in ndb caching already avoid this?

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The KeyProperty version will be more expensive, because a Key takes up more bytes than your typical zip code or town/county name. (Each key repeats the full name of the kind to which it points.)

In addition to the passive storage costs, you'd be paying extra read costs for reading the fields referenced by the keys.

Finally, there's no way to directly do the JOIN you would need to do those queries (although perhaps it would be a matter of only a single lookup).

The only thing that using keys buys you is the possibility of changing the name of a town or county. But how often does that really happen?

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I should have added that each zipcode/town may have other properties, like population and income, and many addresses. Would approach 2 be applicable in this case? Also, in this case, does it make sense to keep the zipcode/town properties as string in the Address model, while normalizing zipcode/town in their own models, to keep the cost low? –  ali Jul 9 '12 at 20:31
    
Now you're on to something. Use the zipcode literally in the Address records, and use it as the 'id' part (in old db: 'key_name') of the Key for the Zipcode records. That way you save space in the Address records and still have a quick way to get to the rest of the info given the zipcode in the Address. –  Guido van Rossum Jul 10 '12 at 7:07
    
Why would a KeyProperty take more space than a StringProperty? I thought a KeyProperty is simply a reference which only stores the id of the key. –  ali Jul 10 '12 at 14:05
    
No, a KeyProperty stores all the information present in the Key -- this includes the following fields: appid, namespace, kind, id; and if there is a parent key also the kind+id of the parent (and the grandparent, if present, and so on). –  Guido van Rossum Jul 11 '12 at 15:58
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Which model is more efficient when querying based on common properties like zipcode?

Assuming that the ZipCode class just holds a String/Int property with the zip code, (1) would accomplish this query with one RPC, (2) would take two RPCs:

(1)

# Get the first 100 adresses with zipcode 55555
addresses = Address.query().filter('zipcode','55555').fetch(limit=100)

(2)

# Get the key of the zipcode 55555
zip = Zipcode.query().filter('code','55555').get()
# Get the first 100 addresses with the zipcode 55555
addresses = StructuredAddress.query().filter('zipcode',zip.key()).fetch(limit=100)

So here (1) is superior.

Assume the case where the number of country properties is about 50, while the number of zipcode properties is about millions. Given millions of address records, which model would be more efficient in this case?

Once again assuming that there is only one string associated with a zipcode and by efficiency you are talking about storage efficiency with (1) you'll only have to store millions of addresses, in (2) you'll have to store millions of addresses and millions of zipcodes so (1) will be more efficient.

So again, (1) will be superior.

Does using KeyProperty in this example mean more read ops, and effectively higher bills? Would built-in ndb caching already avoid this?

In short, yes, as demonstrated by the answer to your first question. Really the only time you would want to use a KeyProperty is when there are multiple fields that would be stored in the reference model.

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What if each zipcode also contains other information, such as the population? Should the zipcode be normalized to its own model (approach 2) in this case? –  ali Jul 9 '12 at 20:12
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