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I have a function that sorts an array and within it, I have custom sort functions. Something like this:

function SortTheArray() {

  function SortCriteria1Asc(a, b) { ... }
  function SortCriteria1Dsc(a, b) { ... }
  function SortCriteria2Asc(a, b) { ... }
  function SortCriteria1Asc(a, b) { ... }

  var CustomSort;

  switch (SomeVar) {

     case 1:
       CustomSort = SortCriteria1Asc;
       break;

     case 2:
        CustomSort = SortCriteria1Dsc;
        break;

     case ....
  }

  SomeDataArray.sort(CustomSort);
}

Is it possible to remove the switch statement and say that the CustomSort function is simply equal to the nth nested function?

Thanks for your suggestions.

share|improve this question
    
Do you really want to make this code even less readable? – GolezTrol Jul 9 '12 at 15:16
    
I find it quite readable; what's not clear? – frenchie Jul 9 '12 at 15:16
    
It is now, but will it be if you use those answers? – GolezTrol Jul 9 '12 at 15:19
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Don't give the function names, store them in an array.

var functions = [
  function (a,b) { ... },
  function (a,b) { ... },
  function (a,b) { ... }
];

Then just:

SomeDataArray.sort(functions[SomeVar]);

… but numerically indexed function identifiers don't sound like a very good idea. You would probably be better off using an object rather than array and giving them descriptive names.

share|improve this answer
    
ah yes, very clever; thanks. – frenchie Jul 9 '12 at 15:15
    
Too bad you even loose more context this way. Now you got SomeVar, having an Integer value, referring to an anonymous function X that apparently sorts in some way... Of course you can comment your code, but then you still got the same number of lines you got in the first place, only less readable. – GolezTrol Jul 9 '12 at 15:17
    
Can I keep the function's in the array name? – frenchie Jul 9 '12 at 15:19
    
@GolezTrol — Well yes, see the last paragraph of the answer. – Quentin Jul 9 '12 at 15:20
    
@frenchie — I don't understand. – Quentin Jul 9 '12 at 15:20

Why don't you defined the inner functions in an object indexed by the variable you are switching by?

function SortTheArray(someVar){

   var sorters = {
       CriteriaA: function(array){ ... };
   };
   return sorters[someVar];
};
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for providing code that shows at least a little clarity by itself. – GolezTrol Jul 9 '12 at 15:18

You can simply build your functions directly in an array :

function SortTheArray() {
   var functions = [];
   functions.push(function(a,b) { ... });

Then you can execute functions[i](a,b).

share|improve this answer
    
ok, great idea, thanks for the answer! – frenchie Jul 9 '12 at 15:16

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