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I'm trying to return a single row from a database:

using (connection = new SqlConnection(ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["connection"]))
{
    using (command = new SqlCommand(@"select top 1 col_1, col_2 from table1", connection))
    {
        connection.Open();

        using (reader = command.ExecuteReader())
        {
            reader.Read();
            return reader["col_1"];
        }
    }
}

But I'm getting the following error message:

Compiler Error Message: CS0266: Cannot implicitly convert type 'object' to 'string'. An explicit conversion exists (are you missing a cast?)
Line 90: return reader["col_1"];

I'm sure I am making a really obvious mistake, but I can't seem to find any single row examples, all I examples I find are for multiple returned rows using a while loop.

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3  
Btw,you're returning a single cell and not a single row! If that's what you want, then look into command.ExecuteScalar() –  banging Jul 9 '12 at 15:18
    
@banging, that sounds spoton. However, is it possible to return a single string instead of an integer using ExecuteScalar? –  oshirowanen Jul 9 '12 at 15:23
    
ExecuteScalar() returns an Object so you'll have to cast it appropriately like so (string)command.ExecuteScalar() –  banging Jul 9 '12 at 15:25

9 Answers 9

up vote 12 down vote accepted

reader["col_1"] returns object.

You want something like reader.GetString(reader.GetOrdinal("col_1")).

Edit -> I just wanted to add a note here that, in addition to the concerns others have raised, a SELECT TOP without an ORDER BY can give you random results based on schema changes and/or merry-go-round scans.

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The problem is the return type. The method you are in is expecting you to return a string, but reader["col_1"] is an object. I suggest returning reader["col_1"].ToString() or Convert.ToString(reader["col_1"]).

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1  
I have to disagree with calling ToString as this will continue to work even if the underlying type changes. In my opinion, if that changes away from string I'd like to get an error telling me as much. If it is really a string, cast it (string)reader[""] or better yet, ask for it reader.GetString(0). –  Adam Houldsworth Jul 9 '12 at 15:18
1  
This doesn't play nice with nulls. Use Convert.ToString(reader["col_1"]) instead.. –  banging Jul 9 '12 at 15:19
    
Thanks @banging, I've added that. –  Jim Jul 9 '12 at 15:20

Instead of:

 using (reader = command.ExecuteReader())
 {
      reader.Read();
      return reader["col_1"];
 }

You need to cast the reader["col_1"] to string, either reader["col_1"].ToString() or reader.GetString(0) like:

return reader.GetString(0);
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1  
That will return the value of col_2, not col_1. –  Guffa Jul 9 '12 at 15:17
1  
Actually, col_1 is the first column - but the column indices are zero-based so you should use reader.GetString(0) to get col_1 as a string... –  marc_s Jul 9 '12 at 15:17

reader["col_1"] returns an object. I assume your function has a return type of string, which is where the error is coming from, it cannot implicitly convert the object to a string.

You probably expect a string returned from col_1 so you can just cast it: (string)reader["col_1"].

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To me it seems, you don't want a single row, only a single value:

SqlConnection sqlConnection = new SqlConnection("Your Connection String");
SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand();
Object returnValue;

cmd.CommandText = "SELECT TOP 1 col_name FROM Customers";
cmd.CommandType = CommandType.Text;
cmd.Connection = sqlConnection1;

sqlConnection.Open();

returnValue = cmd.ExecuteScalar();

sqlConnection.Close();

return returnValue.ToString(); //Note you have to cast it to your desired data type
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You can use an if statement if your query only returns one value

[...]
string x = string.Empty;
if(reader.Read()) {
    // make sure the value is not DBNull
    if(DBNull.Value != reader["col_1"]) {
       x = reader.GetString(0);
    }
}
[...]
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1  
I have to disagree with calling ToString as this will continue to work even if the database type changes. In my opinion, if that changes away from string I'd like to get an error telling me as much. If it is really a string, cast it (string)reader[""] or better yet, ask for it reader.GetString(0). –  Adam Houldsworth Jul 9 '12 at 15:17
    
Note that I previously wrote var x = ... so I'm specifying the type with ToString(), but yeah, reader.GetString(0) is better –  MilkyWayJoe Jul 9 '12 at 15:19
    
No I wasn't saying that the type in code would be incorrect, I am saying it would hide issues with the fact that the value in the database is no longer a string, as .ToString will successfully convert anything other than null into a string. –  Adam Houldsworth Jul 9 '12 at 15:36
    
I get it, but since you mentioned, I've added a check for DBNull and I'm for using built-in functions. That's why I changed. –  MilkyWayJoe Jul 9 '12 at 15:41

This is how I would style (and fix) the code:

using (var connection = new SqlConnection(ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["connection"]))
using (var command = new SqlCommand(@"select top 1 col_1, col_2 from table1", connection))
{
    connection.Open();

    using (var reader = command.ExecuteReader())
    {
        if (reader.Read()) // Don't assume we have any rows.
        {
            int ord = reader.GetOrdinal("col_1");
            return reader.GetString(ord); // Handles nulls and empty strings.
        }

        return null;
    }
}

Using the index reader[] will give you object types, these need casting. However, I hardly touch that style and always favour the slightly more verbose, but more robust use of ordinals and asking for types in a strongly-typed manner.

If you only need the value in the first column of the first row, you can use ExecuteScalar instead, again this returns an object that can be cast and doesn't need a reader:

using (var connection = new SqlConnection(ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["connection"]))
using (var command = new SqlCommand(@"select top 1 col_1, col_2 from table1", connection))
{
    connection.Open();

    var result = command.ExecuteScalar();
    return result == null ? "" : (string)result;
}
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First of all you can use the cast (string)reader["col_1"]. You are probably expecting a string and reader["col_1"] is an object.

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the reader returns object which you should cast it to what you need, in this case a string.

you can use any of this codes :

return reader.GetString(0);

return reader["col_1"].ToString();

return Convert.ToString(reader["col_1"]);

return reader["col_1"] as string;

but dont forget to close the connection and reader before leaving the function.

string ret = reader.GetString(0);
reader.Close();
connection.Close();
return ret;
share|improve this answer
    
He has everything in using so he doesn't need to explicitly close anything! –  banging Jul 9 '12 at 15:28

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