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So i need a way for python to basically detect the difference between a string that looks like this:

W:1.0,X:1.1(A:0.1,B:0.2,(C:0.3,D:0.4)E:0.5,(F:0.6,G:0.7)H:0.8)Y:0.9

and this:

A:0.1,B:0.2,(C:0.3,D:0.4)E:0.5,(F:0.6,G:0.7)H:0.8

Is there any function that can be used to detect that in the first string, there are 2 inner parenthesis following each other, whereas in the second string, the first inner parenthesis is eventually followed by a closed parenthesis? It would be best if it is not a .re regular expression. Thanks!

Edit: I am dealing with ANY case of parenthesis, anything from:

A:0.1,B:0.2,(C:0.3,D:0.4)E:0.5,(F:0.6,G:0.7)H:0.8,(T:0.6,V:0.7)S:0.8,(D:0.6,Y:0.7)P:0.8,(X:0.6,L:0.7)M:0.8

ANY infinite amount on inner 2 child strings... To:

W:1.0,X:1.1(U:5.0(I:9.0)N:8.0,(A:0.1,B:0.2,(C:0.3,D:0.4)E:0.5,(F:0.6,G:0.7)H:0.8)R:3.4(O:5.5)P:3.0)Y:0.9

A highly complicated multiple child-fielded string, that can contain any infinite amount of children with their own children

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1  
And what have we tried so far? –  reptilicus Jul 9 '12 at 15:16
    
i am using: tree[tree.find('(')+1:tree.rfind(')')] to parse away the outer parenthesis, but this will not help me if the string does not contain full outer parenthesis to begin with... –  Sean Jul 9 '12 at 15:18
    
You need to specify your problem more precisely. Are you always dealing with at most two levels of parentheses? If there are two levels, can there only be one outer pair of parentheses? –  Tim Pietzcker Jul 9 '12 at 15:28

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted
s = 'W:1.0,X:1.1(A:0.1,B:0.2,(C:0.3,D:0.4)E:0.5,(F:0.6,G:0.7)H:0.8)Y:0.9'

def max_depth(s, start_ch='(', end_ch=')'):
    depth = 0
    best = 0
    for ch in s:
        if ch == start_ch:
            depth += 1
            best = max(depth, best)
        elif ch == end_ch:
            depth -= 1
            if depth < 0:
                raise ValueError('illegal string - unmatched close-paren')
    if depth:
        raise ValueError('illegal string - unmatched open-paren')
    return best

print max_depth(s)    # => 2
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You could walk the string character by character and count the number of begin vs. end parentheses.

As Tim noted in the comment, you should have logic that identifies when you have more end parentheses than begin parentheses.

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So )))((( would be OK, then? –  Tim Pietzcker Jul 9 '12 at 15:26
    
In my example, there are exactly 3 closing and 3 opening parens, so your edit isn't solving the problem. You need to keep track of the nesting level you're in at every character position. –  Tim Pietzcker Jul 9 '12 at 15:30
    
@Tim, right, that's what I mean. You would start at the first character, find that end > begin, and do whatever is appropriate for your specific code for that invalid state. –  astay13 Jul 9 '12 at 15:32

Here's an awkward numpy approach. It's basically the same as astay13's suggestion, but should be fast for large datasets. If the data is so large that you run out of memory, then it would have to be processed in chunks.

>>> import numpy as np
>>> a = 'W:1.0,X:1.1(A:0.1,B:0.2,(C:0.3,D:0.4)E:0.5,(F:0.6,G:0.7)H:0.8)Y:0.9'
>>> arr = np.fromstring(a, dtype=np.ubyte)
>>> parens = (arr==ord('(')).astype(int) - (arr==ord(')')) ## search for parens

>>> parens   ## 1 marks location of opening paren, -1 marks closing paren
array([ 0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  1,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,
        0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  1,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,
        0,  0, -1,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  1,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,
        0,  0,  0,  0, -1,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0, -1,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0])

>>> parens[1:] += parens[:-1]  ## compute the nesting level at each character position
>>> parens   
array([0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1,
    1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2,
    2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0])
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A regular expression would be a more elegant way to do this, it could be as simple as re.search(r'\(.*?\(.*?\)', string) This would inform you if the string has two open parens before a close paren.

If you don't want to use these however you could iterate over the characters in the string and if you encounter two open parens without a close paren, handle it then

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1  
No it wouldn't. Since the dot also matches parentheses, ((() would be matched by this regex, too. A regular expression (at least in Python) can't handle recursive matching. –  Tim Pietzcker Jul 9 '12 at 15:25
2  
A regular expression as its name indicates can represent any regular gammar and therefore is not able to handle recursion in any language. If you want to be able to handle recursive matching, you need a context-free grammar/parser. –  Xion345 Jul 9 '12 at 15:29
    
@Xion345: Regular expressions have come a long way from matching only regular languages. You can do recursive matching in PHP, Perl, .NET and others. Just not (yet) in Python. –  Tim Pietzcker Jul 9 '12 at 15:32
    
@Tim: regex module supports recursive expressions in Python –  J.F. Sebastian Jul 9 '12 at 16:01
    
@Xion: you don't need recursive matching to answer the question e.g., my answer –  J.F. Sebastian Jul 9 '12 at 16:03

To determine that a line has no nested parentheses (examples 2, 3 in your question):

re.match(r'(?: [^)]  |  \( [^)]* \) )*$', line, re.X)

i.e., a line is a non-paren character or non-nested expression in parens repeated zero or more times.

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