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I'm still in the process of learning SQL. I've done similar queries in two different ways, and was wondering which is better and why.

UPDATE R
    SET R.something = 1
    FROM Table1 R
    JOIN Table2 U
    ON R.value1 = U.value2
    WHERE
        U.value3 BETWEEN 1 AND 5

or

UPDATE R
    SET R.something = 1
    WHERE R.value1 IN
    (SELECT U.value2
    FROM U
    WHERE
        U.value3 BETWEEN 1 AND 5
    )
share|improve this question
3  
did you check the query execution plans? – bluefeet Jul 9 '12 at 15:40
    
Awesome! Didn't know about the execution plans. From what I can tell, they look exactly equal. That doesn't seem correct though. – John Jul 9 '12 at 15:43
3  
The optimizer optimizes :) Two SQL statements with very different syntax will look similar to the database engine if the statistics/indexes are similar. – Stuart Ainsworth Jul 9 '12 at 15:45

Your question does not have a single answer. SQL is a descriptive language, not a procedural language. It depends on the database engine which is going to be more efficient. In addition, indexes can have a big effect on performance.

Your two queries, by the way, are not equivalent. The first can return multiple rows, when there are multiple values in "U". The version with the "IN" does an implicit "DISTINCT". To fix this you would need to add in a specific "DISTINCT".

UPDATE R
    SET R.something = 1
    FROM Table1 R
         JOIN (select distinct value2
               from Table2 U
               WHERE U.value3 BETWEEN 1 AND 5 
              ) u
         ON R.value1 = U.value2  

Also, although I personally like the "FROM" statement in the update, not all databases support it. The version with the "IN" is compatible across a wider range of database engines.

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It all depends on the database that you plan to use (Oracle, SQL Server and etc), its version and sometimes on the amount of data in your tables. But generally you should prefer JOINs, as they are easier for most optimizers and has less gotchas with nulls.

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I can't think of an example where Nulls values factor into JOIN vs IN can you provide one? – Conrad Frix Jul 9 '12 at 17:38
    
"Any null values returned by subquery or expression that are compared to test_expression using IN or NOT IN return UNKNOWN. Using null values in together with IN or NOT IN can produce unexpected results.". See msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms177682.aspx – Dmitry Osinovskiy Jul 9 '12 at 19:59
    
That's a nice quote but that's not an example, nor does it explain how a JOIN would be different. Here's an example where the behavior of JOIN and IN are identical. Can you try and create one where its not? Otherwise I'll still be confused by what you mean by less gotchas with nulls – Conrad Frix Jul 9 '12 at 20:38

First query is better.

Relational databases, regardless of the actual DBMS you're using, are built exactly to join data in that manner and filter it with a where clause. It's their bread and butter. In the second query, you are using a subquery to gather additional data. That's totally cool, and relational databases will churn through that just fine too. But, with the subquery, and in this specific case, you'll just end up with two queries, one to get the U data, and then the outer query will occur, using the data from your subquery to set the R data.

Here's the tricky bit though. In your query, your subquery completely references a separate table. So it'll still be fast. That subquery is contained to just U data. You'll get 2 queries - get the U data, then update R data using the U data. But if you wrote a similar query where the subquery referenced data from R, then you wouldn't get two separate queries. You'd end up doing a full table scan of all the data in R, which would be considerably slower.

Editing for more completeness: as others have said, a lot of it comes down to what DBMS you're using and what it's best at. And when first learning SQL (I'm by no means an expert) one of the hurdles is realizing that there are SO many ways to do the same thing, to get the same results, and then often end up getting optimized to the same thing. So finding the "right" way is often futile, as there isn't a distinct "right" way. I try and write no only for correctness and speed, but also for maintainability - and I find that subqueries can be harder on the brain than necessary. I try to do without them if I can avoid them (so long as the alternative isn't a cursor or something :-D).

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Better will be query with JOIN, because it will be faster than sub-select.

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hmm the OP says the execution plans were identical so it seems unlikely – Conrad Frix Jul 9 '12 at 17:36

It may depend on the engine you are using but I believe MS SQL Server will optimize both to the same query plan.

If an engine does not I would suggest it is inferior in this instance.

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It depends on the database and the database version Searching on whether IN or JOIN is better (faster) returns different results (IN is faster or JOIN is faster) depending on the database and even on the SQL statement - it can even change depending on the database version. It is always a good idea to test with multiple data sizes and different platforms!

(Query #2 is the easiest to read but may or may not be slower)

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