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Unfortunately, due to .NET's lack of an incremental GC (either in the MS or Mono implementation), building soft real-time software such as games with F# is problematic. I've written a language in F# that, if -

a) it doesn't perform adequately in the face of the generational GC (arbitrary pauses during the interactive simulation, and b) OCaml gets a good complete port to the LLVM backend -

I will port it from F# to OCaml. I have avoided as much .NET-specific libraries as I could, and since F#'s syntax is based on OCaml's, I'm assuming there should be some automated tools to assist in converting the code.

Anyone know of such things, either finished or in progress?

Thanks deeply!

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Are you sure it will work better in OCaml? What reasons make you believe on that? –  pad Jul 9 '12 at 15:57
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There are no such tools. Although F# is based on OCaml, it has evolved a lot and is different in a number of ways, so automatic conversion (to readable OCaml) is not trivial. –  Tomas Petricek Jul 9 '12 at 15:59
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"I program in functional style by default, so avoiding allocation with imperative style is not an option" sounds capricious. Both OCaml and F# encourage dropping to imperative style (or even C!) in the 10% of your code that is performance critical. With this attitude, it sounds like your best bet is Haskell/GHC. –  toyvo Jul 9 '12 at 16:37
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Note that some of the avoidance of functional idioms is from F# developers targeting Xbox, where the CLR behaves significantly differently from the PC version. I'd recommend profiling your code to see what your bottlenecks really are rather than making assumptions. –  kvb Jul 9 '12 at 18:46
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@BryanEdds "most F# game devs": Is there anyone beside myself (Asteroid SharpShooter on the XBLIG channel) and the MS team that worked on "The Path of Go"? In any case, I definitely used the "functional by default" approach. I can't speak for the other team, but from presentations I saw, they did the same. Don't presume GC performance will be bad on the PC and take big decisions based on that. Also, don't expect GC in Ocaml to be a lot better. At least .NET gives you some control thanks to value types. –  Joh Jul 10 '12 at 12:18
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To answer your question in an answer - as far as I know, there are no such tools and I do not think it is likely somebody will create them.

Although F# is inspired by OCaml, it has evolved a lot and is different in a number of ways (see this SO discussion), so automatic conversion is not trivial. Even if somebody did that, it would be more like compilation to hard to read OCaml than conversion to idiomatic code that you can later continue working on.

To add a few general comments, when you speak about "real-time" I imagine controlling some robot in a factory dealing with dangerous stuff or an airplane control. In these areas, concerns about GC are certainly valid. However, I do not think games are necessarily "real-time". You need good performance, that's for sure, but people have been writing games with .NET and F# quite happily. For some F# examples, see:

These are probably simpler than what you're aiming for, but it may be good enough to show that writing games using GC is doable.

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Games are in the category of 'soft real-time' software. Apologies for the use of the more blanket term. I have been reading Johann's blog from time to time. Much of it is about how you must fall back on imperative techniques to make games work in F#. Not only do you have to program F# as if it were C#, you can't even use C#'s functional idioms. I am unwilling to fall back on these techniques, I'm afraid. Cont'd... –  Bryan Edds Jul 9 '12 at 16:33
    
...My goal in life is to make practical use of functional programming style for game development. I presume imperative techniques are either being used by default in the F# games you mentioned, or the embarrassing frame drops are being ignored. I hope this is wrong, but I need objective proof. We can program imperatively in F#, sure, but that's not at all my goal :) –  Bryan Edds Jul 9 '12 at 16:34
    
@BryanEdds That makes good sense. I would definitely like to see how purely functional game works in F# compared to dirty imperative style. I suppose most of the people above use F# not as a purely functional language, but as a functional-first language with other nice features. That is, use functional where it makes the most sense (but maybe not for low-level aspects) and benefit from other nice features (i.e. use computation expressions to represent state, which might actually be the most important benefit compared with C#). –  Tomas Petricek Jul 9 '12 at 16:44
    
Thanks! One more nuance however, it's not my goal to write pure functional code everywhere. I just want to write code that by default is purely functional (say, %80+ of the time). I am ecstatic to use other techniques (data-orientation, objects, imperative) when one happens to be the right tool for a particular job. From what I've seen, however, people aren't using F# for games as 'functional-first', as you put it, but as 'imperative-first'... sort of like how many old school game dev's use C++ as C with templates. Total purity is not my goal, but functional-programming-by-default is. –  Bryan Edds Jul 9 '12 at 17:00
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(I have written some games in OCaml for iOS, for what it's worth. They are not at all graphics-heavy, but GC has never caused us any trouble. See my profile for a link to some free example code, etc.) –  Jeffrey Scofield Jul 9 '12 at 22:48
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Unfortunately, due to .NET's lack of an incremental GC (either in the MS or Mono implementation), building soft real-time software such as games with F# is problematic.

A few points here:

  • Incremental GCs are not the only way to get low pause times. Concurrent GCs like VCGC do the work in bulk but do it concurrently with mutators running, e.g. the VCGC implementation I described in the non-free article here was running with sub-millisecond pause times.

  • Incremental GC does not necessarily mean low pause times. For example, OCaml's GC typically incurs 10ms pauses and can incur arbitrarily-long pauses when it encounters a deep thread stack or long array in the heap.

I have measured typical pause times of 10ms with OCaml and 30ms with F# on .NET 3. With a simple implementation I was able to build a fault tolerant server in F# from scratch that handled 20k msgs/s with 50% of latencies under 114us and 95% under 500us.

I've written a language in F# that, if -

a) it doesn't perform adequately in the face of the generational GC (arbitrary pauses during the interactive simulation, and

I wouldn't give up on the platform is your first working version has unacceptable latency. There are lots of things you can do to bring the max latency down.

b) OCaml gets a good complete port to the LLVM backend -

I seriously doubt OCaml will ever get what I'd consider to be a "good complete port to the LLVM backend". They'll just retarget LLVM with the current typeless IR and it won't do much better than the current ocamlopt compiler because LLVM isn't designed to optimize that kind of workload.

I will port it from F# to OCaml. I have avoided as much .NET-specific libraries as I could, and since F#'s syntax is based on OCaml's, I'm assuming there should be some automated tools to assist in converting the code.

No automated tools but I've ported hundreds of thousands of lines of code between OCaml and F# now and it is generally very easy because most code is written in the core ML subset of both languages.

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Hi Jon! I read your article on VCGC - very compelling! According to your data, I now suppose if I need to write (or pay someone to write) a GC for mono, it would be a VCGC. BTW, I sent you an e-mail about an article / possible consulting opportunity to 'consultant@ffconsultancy.com' that I hope you can get around to. Cheers! –  Bryan Edds Aug 10 '12 at 12:24
    
@BryanEdds Oh, I forgot to mention that Mono's support for garbage collection is absolutely awful. You'll have to write Mono's first accurate GC which will require you to fix Mono's entire VM. You're probably looking at a £1m project. –  Jon Harrop Aug 10 '12 at 19:21
    
Well that ain't gonna work... :( –  Bryan Edds Aug 10 '12 at 19:29
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