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Consider the following examples -

Python 2.4.3 (#1, Jan 14 2011, 00:20:04)
[GCC 4.1.2 20080704 (Red Hat 4.1.2-48)] on linux2
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> import os
>>> os.system("grep -i beatles blur.txt")
Blur's debut album Leisure (1991) incorporated the sounds of Madchester and shoegazing. Following a stylistic change.influenced by English guitar pop groups such as The Kinks, The Beatles and XTC.
0
>>> os.system("grep -i metallica blur.txt")
256
>>>

So, in this case, I don't want the line having my searched keyword to be printed on the Python shell, I just want the return value i.e. 0 if keyword is present and non-zero if its not. How to achieve that?

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You just need to use -q key of the grep:

$ python
Python 2.7.3rc2 (default, Apr  5 2012, 18:58:12) 
[GCC 4.6.3] on linux2
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> import os
>>> os.system("grep -iq igor /etc/passwd")
0
>>> os.system("grep -iq oleg /etc/passwd")
256
>>> 

I must note that -q is not portable key of the grep, it will work only with GNU grep (Linux and so on).

When you want to make it work on all systems, you must use popen/subprocess.Popen and redirections of streams.

>>> import subprocess
>>> null = open(os.devnull, "w")
>>> grep = subprocess.Popen(shlex.split("grep -i oleg /etc/passwd"), stderr = null, stdout = null)
>>> grep.communicate()
(None, None)
>>> print grep.returncode
1
>>> grep = subprocess.Popen(shlex.split("grep -i igor /etc/passwd"), stderr = null, stdout = null)
>>> grep.communicate()
(None, None)
>>> print grep.returncode
0
share|improve this answer
    
What is null supposed to be here? – Andrew Clark Jul 9 '12 at 16:22
    
@F.J: sorry, I've missed a string. Thank you for the tip, added the string now. – Igor Chubin Jul 9 '12 at 16:24
    
os.system, .communicate are unnecessary in this case, see F.J.'s answer – J.F. Sebastian Jul 9 '12 at 16:31

Igor Chubin's answer is a good one, but the simplest answer in your case may be just to redirect the output via the shell (since os.system is going to invoke a shell anyway, you may as well use it.)

os.system("grep -i beatles blur.txt > /dev/null 2>&1")
share|improve this answer

For the generic question of "how do I prevent os.system() output from being printed", the best way to do this is to use the subprocess module, which is the recommended way to run external programs and it provides straightforward output redirection.

Here is how this might look for your example:

import os
import subprocess

devnull = open(os.devnull, 'wb')
subprocess.call('grep -i beatles blur.txt', stdout=devnull, stderr=devnull, shell=True)

The shell=True option means that that the program will be executed through the shell, which is what os.system() does, but it is better (safer) to drop the shell=True and pass a list with the command arguments.

subprocess.call(['grep', '-i', 'beatles', 'blur.txt'], stdout=devnull, stderr=devnull)
share|improve this answer
    
+1 almost there. Use 'wb' mode. Pass a list instead of a string and drop shell=True. Use returned value from call. You could also specify stderr=STDOUT – J.F. Sebastian Jul 9 '12 at 16:28
    
Thanks for the suggestions. – Andrew Clark Jul 9 '12 at 16:39

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