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I'm using hiccup to generate some checkboxes followed by labels. The original code looked like this:

(check-box "check1")
(label "check1" "Check1") 
(check-box "check2")
(label "check2" "Check2")
(check-box "check1")
(label "check3" "Check3")
(check-box "check4")
(label "check4" "Check4")

Which, after a lot of tinkering, I got down to the following line:

(map
    (fn [x]
        (map
            #(get (vector
                (check-box x)
                (label x (capitalize x)))%)
            [0 1]))
    ["check1" "check2" "check3" "check4"])

Which works, but I feel I'm not doing it in a very lisp-like/optimized/correct/etc. way - especially returning a vector just to scoop out those values with get. Is there a better way to do this?

share|improve this question
    
to be honest, I'm not exactly sure what you're trying to accomplish here. –  Timothy Baldridge Jul 9 '12 at 16:54
    
What's the [0 1] do? –  Theo Belaire Jul 9 '12 at 16:55
    
@Tyr as part of the inner map it gets the (check-box x) item out of the map and then the (label x (capitalize x)) item out of the map. The entire internal map could be replaced by [(check-box x) (label x (capitalize x))] –  deterb Jul 9 '12 at 19:59
    
if the second block of code is meant to be equivalent to the first then i suspect the first needs something like a [...] around it. because otherwise it appears to be executed for side effects. –  andrew cooke Jul 9 '12 at 20:02

3 Answers 3

Perhaps destructuring is what you need?

(defn multi-return-fn []
  [:1 :2 :3])

(let [[x y z] (multi-return-fn)]
    (println x)
    (println y)
    (println z))

Destructuring also works in fn arguments, loop, for loops, etc.

share|improve this answer

As others have noted, your question is not very clear, but in the context of a normal Hiccup application the below is a reasonable thing to assume you might want:

(apply concat
       (for [boxnum (range 1 5)
             :let [lower-name (str "check" boxnum)
                   upper-name (str "Check" boxnum)]]
         [(check-box lower-name)
          (label lower-name upper-name)]))

There are a number of other ways you could write it; this one errs on the side of being lengthy and clear, rather than terse.

share|improve this answer
    
This is almost exactly what I would do outside of using mapcat instead of applying concat on the for. –  deterb Jul 9 '12 at 19:57
1  
Well, I often prefer to write (for [x xs, item [(f x) (g x)]] item) instead of (apply concat (for [x xs] [(f x) (g x)])), but people usually don't find that as clear to read. –  amalloy Jul 9 '12 at 23:25
    
Interesting. Took me a few moments to grok what was actually happening, but I like how that's handling the "concatenation". I need to mix and match a bunch of existing functions quite often, so I tend to think about using the map functions with ->> more often. Thanks. –  deterb Jul 10 '12 at 13:33

Edited after comment from amalloy

I do not know hiccup, and I do not fully understand what you are trying to do. Specifically, I don't understand the get aspect of the one line that you got to do what it is you want it to. However, it seems like you are saying you want a list of return values from the following code block:

(check-box "check1")
(label "check1" "Check1") 
(check-box "check2")
(label "check2" "Check2")
(check-box "check1")
(label "check3" "Check3")
(check-box "check4")
(label "check4" "Check4")

If I'm right that that is what you want to do, then the easiest way--but the least general way--is to simply wrap it all in a call to list. However, to make it more general and idiomatic, I would do it the following way:

(apply concat
  (for [x [1 2 3 4]
        :let [name (str "check" x)]]
    [(check-box name)
     (label name (capitalize name))]))

for works by binding the variable (or variables), in this case x, to one element of a sequence one at a time and looping until it has gone through all of them. In this way, it goes through 1, 2, 3, and 4, then inside the let binds name to (str "check" x). For example, in the first iteration, name will be bound as "check1". The rest is simply calling the check-box and label functions with appropriate arguments.

If you wanted to generalize this further--for example, maybe you don't know how many check boxes and labels you would want--you could do that easily like so:

(defn make-n-checkboxes-and-labels
  [n]
  (apply concat
    (for [x (range 1 (inc n))
          :let [name (str "check" x)]]
      [(check-box name)
       (label name (capitalize name))])))

In this case, it has now been generalized to a function, and you could do the exact same thing as before, but now by doing:

(make-n-checkboxes-and-labels 4)

Again, I didn't do any research on hiccup so I may not know exactly what you trying to do. Also, Timothy may be suggesting (implicitly, not explicitly), that you replace your strings with keywords. I would reiterate that suggestion, because keywords should be faster and nicer to look at (in this case, they are also probably more idiomatic). If you wanted to replace your strings with keywords, it should be a simple matter of wrapping (keyword) around the strings, like so:

(keyword (str "check" 1))
=> :check1

Good luck!

share|improve this answer
    
doseq is definitely not the answer here. He needs values, not side effects. –  amalloy Jul 9 '12 at 18:20
    
Ah, I see. In that case, your answer using for makes the most sense (and also, cool :let notation--I didn't know about that). –  Omri Bernstein Jul 9 '12 at 19:40

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