Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here is my code:

import java.util.List;

public class ItemList implements Iterable<Entry> {
    private List<Entry> entries;

    public static class Entry {
        private final String id;
        private int quantity;
    }

    @Overide public Iterator<Entry> iterator() {
        return entries.iterator();
    }
}

This code will not compile. (It claims it cannot find the "Entry" type in the ItemList class definition).

I want other classes to be able to iterate over the internal entries of this List. I would rather not move the Entry class to a separate file, as that would require exposing many of the inner workings of that class to all of the other classes in the package.

My question is then: Why won't this compile? And, what is the best way around this problem?

share|improve this question
    
How might ItemList be used? –  Sam I am Jul 9 '12 at 16:37
2  
Try making the class Entry static. –  Philipp Wendler Jul 9 '12 at 16:37
    
This structure intuitively does not make sense. You are implementing Iterable of a private type. How can external classes use your ItemList without knowledge of Entry? –  Tudor Jul 9 '12 at 16:40
    
Now, I'm use to c# as opposed to java, but it seems to me that ItemList cannot truly implement Iterable<Entry> so long as Entry is private. It just doesn't make sense. –  Sam I am Jul 9 '12 at 16:40
    
@SamIam ItemList is just a wrapper around the List. Basically, I want to prevent other classes from using some of the List functionality. –  user1512542 Jul 9 '12 at 16:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The problem is scoping. Since Entry is an inner class it needs to be prefixed by the name of the "parent". Try this:

class ItemList implements Iterable<ItemList.Entry> {

    private List<Entry> entries;

    public static class Entry {
        private final String id = null;
        private int quantity;     
    }

    @Override public Iterator<Entry> iterator() {
        return entries.iterator();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much, that was it. I can't believe I didn't think of that! –  user1512542 Jul 9 '12 at 16:48

Entry is a private class so other classes won't be able to see it. you can make it public but still keep it nested.

It should also be static since it doesn't depend on any state of the outer class.

share|improve this answer
2  
Even with the Entry public static, you still get the compile error. –  user1512542 Jul 9 '12 at 16:42
    
Can you post the full class? –  Jeff Storey Jul 9 '12 at 16:43
    
Pardon me for my ignorance, but Entry appears to be intended to be an instanceable class. are static classes instanceable in java? –  Sam I am Jul 9 '12 at 16:43
1  
Sure, a static class just means that it doesn't require an instance of the outer class. –  Jeff Storey Jul 9 '12 at 16:47
    
See @Tudors answer. It is correct. I missed the fact that the generic parameter did not include the outer class name. –  Jeff Storey Jul 9 '12 at 16:49

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.