Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am currently trying to simplify a script. Instead of manually entering a host name for each command, I'd like to be able to use variables? arrays? of some sort. Was wondering if you can help.

Example:

hostname1=192.168.1.1
hostname2=192.168.1.2

echo "What would you like to do?"
echo "(1)Ping Hosts"
echo "(2)mkdir /tmp/test"
echo "(3)write to test.txt"
read num_variable

if num_variable = 1
then
ping hostname1
ping hostname2

if num_variable = 2 
ssh -n hostname1 "mkdir /tmp/test"
ssh -n hostname2 "mkdir /tmp/test"

if num_variable = 3
ssh -n hostname1 "echo 'hello' > /tmp/test/test.txt"
ssh -n hostname2 "echo 'hello' > /tmp/test/test.txt"

"Is there an easier way to write this?"

Example:

Hosts=hostname1,hostname2

Commands here?

I'd hate to have 20,000 lines when all i could do is list the hostnames on top and for each num variable execute all of the commands below for the hosts listed in that particular section.

share|improve this question
    
Note that you want if [ $num_variable = 1 ], etc –  chepner Jul 9 '12 at 19:05
    
Yeah.. it was simplified version. :) Thank you:) –  Shaun Magruder Jul 11 '12 at 15:59

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Create an array:

hosts=(hostname1 hostname2 hostname3)

You can split it to multiple lines:

hosts=(
        hostname1 
        hostname2 
        hostname3
      )

Iterate over the elements:

for host in "${hosts[@]}"
do
    echo "$host"
done

Access a particular host:

echo "${hosts[2]}"

Use the select command to create a menu:

PS3='Please enter your choice: '
options=("Option 1" "Option 2" "Option3" "Quit")
select opt in "${options[@]}"
do
    echo "Opt: $opt, Reply: $REPLY"
    case $opt in
        "Option 1")
            echo "you chose choice 1"
            ;;
        "Option 2")
            echo "you chose choice 2"
            ;;
        "Option 2")
            echo "you chose choice 3"
            ;;
        "Quit")
            break
            ;;
        *) echo invalid option;;
    esac
done
share|improve this answer
    
All of you helped tremendously. Thanks so much! –  Shaun Magruder Jul 9 '12 at 18:37

Bash does have arrays that you can iterate over.

hosts=(hostname1
       hostname2
       hostname3)

for host in "${hosts[@]}"; do
   ssh -n "$host" "echo 'hello' > /tmp/test/test.txt" 
done
share|improve this answer
1  
All of you helped tremendously. Thanks so much! –  Shaun Magruder Jul 9 '12 at 18:36
    
Happy to help. The best way to say "thanks" is by upvoting the answer. –  jordanm Jul 9 '12 at 18:52
    
I guess I'm unable to. I tried. :( –  Shaun Magruder Jul 11 '12 at 15:58

There is really good tutorial on this topic in the Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide: Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide - Arrays

share|improve this answer
1  
The ABS is a mediocre resource. This is much better. –  Dennis Williamson Jul 9 '12 at 17:50
    
All of you helped tremendously. Thanks so much! –  Shaun Magruder Jul 9 '12 at 18:36
    
+1 for BashGuide –  jordanm Jul 9 '12 at 18:53

You can use a for loop and a case statement.

An example of a for loop would be:

nodes="192.168.1.1 192.168.1.2 192.168.1.3"
for node in $nodes
do
    echo $node
done

An example of a case statement would be

case "$num_variable" in
    "1" ) echo "1";;
    "2" ) echo "2";;
    "3" ) echo "3";;
esac

Combining the two is an exercise for you :-)

A good reference to bash is the Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide.

share|improve this answer
    
All of you helped tremendously. Thanks so much! –  Shaun Magruder Jul 9 '12 at 18:36
    
This would be a good way if the code was meant to be portable to other POSIX shells. –  jordanm Jul 9 '12 at 18:54
    
@jordanm Hey, what is wrong with portable code? I thought that was supposed to be a good thing... –  Reinier Torenbeek Jul 9 '12 at 19:21
    
Restricting yourself to POSIX-only features can result in ugly and more difficult to maintain code. Most of us inside of a linux bubble really don't care if our code will run on a *bsd machine, and would rather make use of the extended features. –  jordanm Jul 9 '12 at 19:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.