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I am trying to find some special numbers such that when it is divided by 2 gives 1, divided by 3 gives 2 and so on upto 6.

This perfectly works.

[ x | x <- [1..1000],x `mod` 2 == 1 , x `mod` 3 == 2 , x `mod` 4 == 3 , x `mod` 5 == 4 , x `mod` 6 == 5]

Ans:

[59,119,179,239,299,359,419,479,539,599,659,719,779,839,899,959]

I am trying to make it better so that it is not too verbose but the following doesn't work.

[ x | x <- [1..1000], y <- [2..6], x `mod` y == (y-1) ]

It takes all x for which any of the y satisfies the condition but what I want is, I want x which satisfies the condition for all y.

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alternate solution hint: these numbers are also congruent to -1 modulo 2,3,4,5,and 6. –  Jimmy Jul 9 '12 at 17:38
    
Hint: try using the all function –  n.m. Jul 9 '12 at 17:40
1  
Do you know of the Chinese remainder theorem? –  FUZxxl Jul 9 '12 at 17:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can write the condition as

[ x | x <- [1..1000], all (\y -> x `mod` y == y-1) [2 .. 6]]

But you can do better in this specific case,

let modulus = foldl1 lcm [2 .. 6]
[x | x <- [1 .. 1000], x `mod` modulus == modulus - 1]
[modulus - 1, 2*modulus - 1 .. 1000]  -- even better
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List comprehension is short, but often obscure. It is often easier to write/read monadic code. Let's translate first version

do
x <- [1..1000] -- here a value is selected
guard $ x `mod` 2 == 1  -- it checked
guard $ x `mod` 3 == 2 -- and checked
guard $ x `mod` 4 == 3 
guard $ x `mod` 5 == 4 
guard $ x `mod` 6 == 5 -- you got the point
return x -- value returned

and second is

do
x <- [1..1000] -- value selected
y <- [2..6]  -- another value selected
guard $ x `mod` y == (y-1) -- the pair of previously selected values is checked 
return x -- and now the first value returned.

===

second written correct:

do
x <- [1..1000]
guard $ and $ do
              y <- [2..6] 
              return $ x `mod` y == 1
return x

it can be rewritten in many ways, including

[x | x <- [1..1000], and [x `mod` y == 1 | y <- [2..6] ] ]
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Just for the record, you may still "recover" the solution from your second attempt:

import Data.List

map head $ filter ((==5).length) $ group [ x | x <- [1..1000], y <- [2..6], x `mod` y == (y-1) ] 
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