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Please consider the following boilerplate class fragment:

class ObjectA : public BaseObject
{
    DerivedMemberA a, a2, a3;
    DerivedMemberB b;
    DerivedMemberC c;
    // ...
};  

The DerivedMember* types are derived from a common BaseMember class, and ObjectA (and similar ObjectB, ObjectC...) would be derived from BaseObject.

Now I'd like to implement an iterator which would be in public BaseObject interface, and which would iterate over references to members of the derived classes (as BaseMember&).

In other words, the use would be like:

BaseObject& b = someObject;
for (BaseObject::iterator it = b.begin(); it != b.end(); ++it)
{
    BaseMember& m = *it;
    // ...
}

which called on ObjectA would iterate over a, a2...

What is the best way to solve this? Preferably avoiding subclassing the iterator as well. Is there any ready iterator class or template which could be reused there?

I was thinking of implementing a virtual member function which would take numerical 'index' of a variable and using a switch to return the appropriate reference; then calling that member from index-keeping iterator.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

C++ doesn't have any concept of introspection, so there's absolutely no way for the base class to know what members are defined in the derived class.

The best you can do is create a virtual function in each derived class that iterates through its own members.

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It would be best if you did this using arrays. The code you have currently:

DerivedMemberA a, a2, a3;
DerivedMemberB b, b2;
DerivedMemberC c, c2;

has barely any real structure to it. Instead of using 3 DerivedMemberA objects, why not use an array of DerivedMemberA objects? Same goes for B and C.

-Reagan

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I don't think arrays would be beneficial here. Since the object are named like in, out etc., I think putting them into arrays will make the code less readable (i.e. in() would call a_type_members[0] etc.)... –  Michał Górny Jul 9 '12 at 18:19
    
your example down below looks pretty dirty IMO -- if you don't like the idea of arrays indices not having names, you could always define some constants for the indices you will be using –  reagan Jul 9 '12 at 18:27
    
Wouldn't this be more of reinventing C++ in C? And it will still require writing or reusing an iterator which would grab the references from arrays. –  Michał Górny Jul 10 '12 at 8:19
    
basically, yea. I don't see anything wrong with that, haha. –  reagan Jul 10 '12 at 13:11
    
By the way, I've modified the question to emphasize that usually there will be just one member of a given type. –  Michał Górny Jul 10 '12 at 13:13
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A quick & dirty proof-of-concept:

template <class Source, class Type>
class MyIterator : public std::iterator<std::input_iterator_tag, Type>
{
    typedef Type* (Source::*getter_method)(int n);

    Source& _inst;
    getter_method _getter;
    int _index;
    bool _end;
    Type* _curr_val;

public:
    MyIterator(Source& instance, getter_method method, bool end = false)
        : _inst(instance), _getter(method), _index(0), _end(end)
    {
        if (!end)
            ++*this;
    }

    void operator++()
    {
        assert(!_end);
        _curr_val = (_inst.*_getter)(_index++);

        if (!_curr_val)
            _end = true;
    }

    bool operator!=(MyIterator rhs)
    {
        return _end != rhs._end;
    }

    Type& operator*()
    {
        assert(!_end);

        return *_curr_val;
    }
};

With an object implemented like:

class BaseObject
{
protected:
    virtual BaseMember* iterator_getter(int n) = 0;

public:
    typedef MyIterator<BaseObject, BaseMember> iterator;

    iterator begin()
    {
        return iterator(*this, &BaseObject::iterator_getter);
    }

    iterator end()
    {
        return iterator(*this, &BaseObject::iterator_getter, true);
    }
};

and the derived object like:

class ObjectA : public BaseObject
{
    // ...
protected:
    virtual BaseMember* iterator_getter(int n)
    {
        BaseMember* ret;

        switch (n)
        {
            case 0:
                ret = &a;
                break;
            case 1:
                ret = &a2;
                break;
            case 2:
                ret = &a3;
                break;
            // ...
            default:
                ret = 0;
        }

        return ret;
    }

What do you think?

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