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I am looking for clarification about synchronized blocks. Consider this class -

public class A{
Map map;

 public getValue(String key){
  return map.get(key);
 }

 public remove(String key){
  synchronized(map){
   map.remove(key);
  }
 }
}

A is a singleton. getValue is heavily accessed throughout the app by multiple threads. I am adding a new method, remove, that removes a key from the map. If remove is implemented as above,

  1. When a thread is in the synchronized block of the remove method, I assume it will acquire a lock on the map object. Does that mean other threads trying to access the map via the getValue method will be blocked? (I'd like them to.)
  2. When no thread is in the synchronized block of remove method, will threads accessing the getValue method function as usual i.e. not block each other? (I'd like that too).

I want the getValue threads to block only if there is a thread performing the remove operation.

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only blocks which are synchronized will block. –  Peter Lawrey Jul 9 '12 at 18:47
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7 Answers 7

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The one rule of synchronized is that only one thread can be in a synchronized(foo) block at a time, for the same foo. That's the only rule of synchronized.

Well, there's some complicated stuff about memory barriers and the like, and a single thread can be in several nested synchronized(foo) blocks for the same foo at the same time:

void thing() {
  synchronized(foo) {
    stuff(); // this works fine!
  }
}
void stuff() {
  synchronized(foo) {
    doMoreStuff();
  }
}

... but the rule stated above is basically the key to understanding synchronized.

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When a thread is in the synchronized block of the remove method, I assume it will acquire a lock on the map object. Does that mean other threads trying to access the map via the getValue method will be blocked?

No. Which means you've got a problem, unless you happen to be using a thread-safe map implementation.

When no thread is in the synchronized block of remove method, will threads accessing the getValue method function as usual i.e. not block each other? (I'd like that too).

They won't block each other, no. Again, you'll need to make sure that's okay with whichever Map implementation you're using, although it's much more likely to be okay than reading at the same time as writing.

You should consider using a ConcurrentMap implementation (e.g. ConcurrentHashMap), at which point you don't need any synchronization at all.

If you can't use that, I'd recommend synchronizing in both getValue and remove - and measuring the performance. Acquiring an uncontended lock is reasonably cheap - do you really need to go lock-free? (Using ConcurrentHashMap is a fairly simple way of avoiding the issue, of course, but you should always consider whether extra complexity is needed to achieve the performance you require before you start micro-optimizing.)

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Thanks for the quick answer. So, when you say synchronized(object), does it mean that two threads if they reach that block of code must wait on each other to work with the synchronized object? That is only threads in that method will block on each other for access to the object? Thanks! –  septerr Jul 9 '12 at 18:50
    
@septerr: No, not just threads in that method - any thread trying to synchronize on that object's monitor. Basically, imagine each object comes with a padlock attached. Nothing automatically locks the padlock, but only one thread can lock it at a time, wherever it's asked to lock it. –  Jon Skeet Jul 9 '12 at 18:53
1  
The one rule of synchronized is that only one thread can be in a synchronized(foo) block at a time, for the same foo. That's the only rule of synchronized. –  Louis Wasserman Jul 9 '12 at 18:53
    
@LouisWasserman: Well, there's also the memory barrier side of things... and that the foo expression is only evaluated once, and the same monitor is released as was acquired, even if the value of foo changes... –  Jon Skeet Jul 9 '12 at 18:54
    
Eh, fair. Rephrase: 80% of StackOverflow questions about synchronized can be answered by some special case of that one rule. –  Louis Wasserman Jul 9 '12 at 18:55
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If I understood correctly your need, you could take a look at the ConcurrentMap and of course ConcurrentHashMap which I believe was introduced with Java 5.0 and supports a level of concurrency.

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You don't show how the Map instance is instantiated, but assuming it is not a thread-safe collection instance, this code is not thread-safe.

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It is a regular HashMap. Thanks for the answer. I am trying to make it thread safe without impacting performance. The remove method will be called rarely while the getValue will be called a lot. I will read up on ConcurrentMap. –  septerr Jul 9 '12 at 18:53
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1. getValue() is not synchronized, when a thread acquires the lock of an object, it has the control over all the synchronized blocks... not the Non-synchronized one.. So other threads can access the getValue() when as thread is in sychronized(map) block

2. Use HashTable, which is a sychronized MAP

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You have a chicken and egg problem with

I want the getValue threads to block only if there is a thread performing the remove operation.

Without some sort of inter-thread interaction, you cannot figure out whether there is some other thread performing a remove.

The correct way to implement getValue(...) is to synchronize on the map.

I recommend dropping your own locking, and using a ConcurrentHashMap and utilizing a lot of work into concurrent performance.

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You said singleton, right ?

which means it should be like this ...

public class A{


Map map;

    A a;

    private A()  {

    }

    synchronized  A getInstance()  {
        if(a!=null)
            return new A();
        else
            return null;
    }

 public getValue(String key){
  return map.get(key);
 }

 public remove(String key){
  synchronized(map){
   map.remove(key);
  }
 }
}

I hope this will work for both the scenarios which you mentioned above.

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if the getInstance() method is synchronized, then totally only one instance of this class will be available in the entire application irrespective of multiple threads. so this will block different threads getting map object. –  user1512839 Jul 9 '12 at 19:01
    
this code is thread safe :) –  user1512839 Jul 9 '12 at 19:02
    
Just because you say it's thread-safe doesnt mean it is thread-safe. getValue is not thread-safe as you are not blocking on reads. And also, you will return a new instance each time? This isn't correct by any means (not to mention, not a singleton). –  John Vint Jul 10 '12 at 17:02
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