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package AA;

package BB;
use AA;

package CC;
use BB;

Do i have to put "use AA" in CC, or is that implicit ?

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6  
What happened when you tried to use stuff from AA in CC, assuming these are all in separate files? –  Sinan Ünür Jul 9 '12 at 19:24
    
i didnt try earlier, i was reviewing a large codebase and this question came to my mind. Thanks for ur replies !! –  trinity Jul 9 '12 at 20:38

4 Answers 4

package AA;

package BB;
use AA;

package CC;
use BB;

is nearly the same as:

package CC;
use BB;
BEGIN{ require AA }

or

package CC;
use BB;
use AA ();

This is because use does two things. It loads the file with require, then calls the import method on it.

So these are equivalent.

use Module qw'LIST';
BEGIN { require Module; Module->import( qw'LIST' ); }

You may have a problem if package BB doesn't need the use AA; line anymore, and it gets removed.

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It depends mainly on whether the modules involved are object-oriented ones or simple modules that use Exporter to make symbols available in the calling package.

What use does is first to require the given module and then call its import method.

require first checks %INC to see if the module has already been successfully loaded. If not, all the paths in @INC are searched for a matching module file and the first match is loaded with the equivalent of do.

The modules import method can do anything the author cares to write, but generally a module will subclass Exporter which provides an import method that, amongst other things, copies the symbols in the package's @IMPORT array to the calling package, making the symbols available there without fully-qualifying them with their package name.

In your example, if the modules subclass Exporter, symbols listed in @BB::IMPORT will be copied to the CC namespace and can be used from that package. Nothing has been imported from AA though, so subroutines from there can be called only by explicitly calling them as AA::subroutine() etc.

On the other hand, if the packages are object-oriented modules and BB subclasses AA, then normally there is no import method to call and the methods are accessed either through blessed variables or a class name (package name). Methods not defined in BB can be inherited from AA and Perl's implementation of the object-oriented inheritance system uses the package's @ISA array to determine where to continue searching for methods.

To summarize, if your module BB subclasses Exporter then you will also have to use AA. But if it is object-oriented and subclasses AA then all methods from both BB and AA are available to CC by just using use BB.

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You can use a module as long as it's been loaded before by something. This is why you can use objects created by other modules without knowing what object type they are. For example, you can use an HTTP::Response object you get back from an LWP method, although you never loaded HTTP::Response yourself or realized it was that sort of object. However, the use only imports into the calling namespace, so those imports won't show up in other packages (even though you can still call them with the complete package specification).

You should use any module that your package wants to use directly. That is, use the modules for the objects that you directly create.

You also shouldn't rely on other packages to load modules for you. If someone changes those modules, you'll be stuck wondering why things broke. And, even then, you rely on module loading order to ensure that it all works out.

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use does two things: Loads a module (as if by require) if it's not already loaded, and calls the module's import method. Not sure how loading a module or calling a method can can be transitive.

As for your second question, it depends, primarily on whether AA has an import method.

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