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I was reading a wikipedia article on Trimming and saw this implementation of ltrim (left trim)

char *
ltrim(char *str)
{
  char *ptr;
  int  len;

  for (ptr = str; *ptr && isspace((int)*ptr); ++ptr);

  len = strlen(ptr);
  memmove(str, ptr, len + 1);

  return str;
}

Would bad things happen if I skip memmove and return ptr isntead?

char *
ltrim(char *str)
{
  char *ptr;
  int  len;

  for (ptr = str; *ptr && isspace((int)*ptr); ++ptr);

  return ptr;
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

If you return ptr -- i.e., a pointer value other than the original pointer -- and if that pointer is the only pointer to the original memory block, then no one will be able to free() it, and there will be a memory leak. You can't call free() on a pointer into the middle of an allocated block, but only on a pointer to the beginning of the block -- i.e., only on a pointer originally returned by malloc().

If for some reason you can be sure that a pointer to the original block will be preserved, or the block will never need to be freed, then the memmove() isn't needed; but those are bad assumptions for a general purpose utility routine.

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Since it mutates the contents of the original pointer and returns the original pointer... I believe the return type should be void. It's misleading otherwise. –  Thomas Eding Jul 9 '12 at 19:33
    
@trinithis -- I dunno. What about being able to write something like char * ptr = ltrim(rtrim(getline())) ? –  Ernest Friedman-Hill Jul 9 '12 at 19:35

Biggest problem: This is not the way ltrim() is expected to work.

ltrim() is expected to have a side effect, to change the string in place.

For example,

char *a = " hello";
trim(a);
printf(a);

Would be expected to print "hello", but without memmove() it won't.

Edited to add:

A comment below reasonably asks, "Expected by who?"

In a language with automatic garbage collection, I expect string functions to return a new string with the desired transformation.

For those without it (which is the case here), I expect them to change the string in place, sometimes returning a pointer to the result, sometimes not.

So perhaps I should have said: This is not the way C functions are expected to work.

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Expected by who? It may work this way in some languages, but it doesn't in most. Here is the first Google hit for "ltrim C", and the implementation shown there returns a new pointer to the unmodified original data. In fact, to implement your version in C, the argument would have to be pointer-to-pointer-to-char, and so it couldn't even be called the way you've shown above, and the fact that you couldn't call it on an rvalue would be an immense pain. –  Ernest Friedman-Hill Jul 9 '12 at 21:26
    
I don't understand Ernest's statement that the argument would have to be pointer-to-pointer-to-char. If the input string is not modified by ltrim, then the call to ltrim can be easily replaced by a simple s += strspn (s, " \t\f\r\n") ; with whatever characters you want as whitespace. –  Alex Measday Jul 10 '12 at 3:53
    
@ErnestFriedman-Hill, I've amended my answer. –  egrunin Jul 10 '12 at 15:09
    
In other words, you're saying the memmove() is, indeed, required -- it would help to state that explicitly. –  Ernest Friedman-Hill Jul 10 '12 at 15:37
    
@ErnestFriedman-Hill - ah, now I see what you were asking. Fixed, I think. –  egrunin Jul 10 '12 at 21:31

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