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In which file will the "Project-->Options-->Directories/Conditions" details get stored? Is it in build.dat or in project_name.dof?

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I know the question is specifically for Delphi 5, but just a note, later versions of Delphi (2007 and up?) store this in the .dproj file. –  Jerry Dodge Jul 10 '12 at 0:10

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I have no idea where you find a build.dat but configuration details get stored

  • in your .dof file
  • in a .cfg for command line compilation.

Look here for a complete list of all extensions used in a Delphi project.

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thanks.. I we change the options from IDE then it will automatically update the .cfg? –  Nalu Jul 9 '12 at 19:28
    
@Naren - Yes it will. –  Lieven Keersmaekers Jul 9 '12 at 19:29
    
one more thing. If I dont have .dof and I am having only .cfg and then open a project then it will take the settings from .cfg? Because in my case I am having only .cfg and when I open project then it take the settings of the project which I opened previously. –  Nalu Jul 9 '12 at 19:33
    
@Naren - I can't verify it at the moment but if memory serves me well, there should be a template .dof file in your Delphi installation folder. I believe that's the one that get's used if you don't have a .dof file for your project but I find it strange you don't have one after saving a project. –  Lieven Keersmaekers Jul 9 '12 at 19:40
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@Naren, from the helpfile "The compiler searches for a dcc32.cfg in the compiler executable directory, then for dcc32.cfg in the current directory, and then finally for projectname.cfg in the project directory.". The content of .cfg consists of dcc32.exe compiler settings and options. You can have alook of their meaning by typing dcc32 from the command prompt. The content of .cfg has their corresponding value in .dof file. Just create an empty project & save it. Open side by side those files, and you will see what I meant. –  Hendra Jul 10 '12 at 5:09

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