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I want to design class hierarchy. Super class has an abstract method, sub class has to override this method, but my problem is: this method use data of super class (instance variable).

I've designed some style to solve this problem:

Style 1: Use private instance variable and create other instance variable in sub class

class SuperClass {
    private T data;

    public SuperClass(T data) { /* ... */}

    public abstract void doSomething();
}

class SubClass extends SuperClass {
    private T data; // use another variable

    public SubClass(T data) {
        super(data);
        this.data = data;
    }

    public void doSomething() {
        // use 'data'
        int length = data.getLength(); // for example...
    }
}

Style 2: Use protected instance variable:

class SuperClass {
    protected T data;

    public SuperClass(T data) { /* ... */}

    public abstract void doSomething();
}

class SubClass extends SuperClass {
    public void doSomething() {
        // use 'data'
        int length = data.getLength(); // for example...
    }
}

Style 3: Use private instance variable and protected method:

class SuperClass {
    private T data;

    public SuperClass(T data) { /* ... */}

    public abstract void doSomething();

    protected T getData() {
        return data;
    }
}

class SubClass extends SuperClass {
    public void doSomething() {
        // use 'data'
        int length = getData.getLength(); // for example...
    }
}

Which of them is better? Or have more solutions to solve my problem better?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The third approach is usually preferred and, if you design for public subclassing, is a must. A superclass wants to maintain as much control as possible over its internals.

If, on the other hand, you are developing a closed hierarchy that is all in the same package, or at least all in the same project, you can choose to expose the var as protected, if there's any benefit to be had.

Duplicating a private var in the subclass is a failure on all counts, however. I can't think of any scenario where that would help anything.

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IMHO solution #1 is poor because it duplicates the reference unnecessarily, leading to confusion (it's not even about memory consumption or consistency)

Solution #2 and #3 are equally good. If you make your data field final:

protected final T data;

solution #2 is best you can get.

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It depends on the situation. For example, the first solution could be used just when the data you need is passed by constructor. The second has the problem that the field itself is accessible by the extending classes (and they could change the value). The third one is an approach encapsulate the data in the class.

  1. If you need to change the field on the subclasses you could use approach 2;
  2. If you have data as constructor the approach 1;
  3. If you just need to expose but hold details encapsulated, approach 3.

They aren't the same thing.

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  • Style1 : SuperClass.data and SubClass.data are two different variables and so there is no guarantee that they would refer to the same object.
  • Style2 : This would work well but the SubClass can change the reference of the SuperClass variable - For eg. can set the variable to null. It wont be clear who - which classes - updates the variable.
  • Style3 : I would consider this the best way, because the SuperClass truly encapsulates and controls access to member variable.
    We could also make the getData() method final so that the design cannot be misused.
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I'd user version 2 since it is the most simple. I'd try to make data final though. Otherwise subclasses might change data in unexpected moments.

But appart from personal preferences the approaches don't differ to much. And if a change occurse that actually make them different in some relevant way it is easy to refactor one into the others.

Of course there is always the possibility of some much better design (maybe without inheritance at all) is lurking somewhere, but we can't tell from the information provided.

Update prompted by the comment:

One example I see quite often is: Subclasses (B extends A) that implement some kind of strategy. In these cases it might make more sense to actually pass the strategy object as a parameter to A wich calls a method of B passing in the parameter.

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Can you give me a simple example? I'm just a beginner, so I don't have much experience. Thanks! –  Bood Carley Jul 9 '12 at 20:05
    
Added an example of a case where an alternative solution without inheritence exists. –  Jens Schauder Jul 10 '12 at 14:02

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