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And it's driving me crazy.

My TERM = xterm-256color, emacs 23.3.1. I'm using Ubuntu, and this problem doesn't occur on OS X using the same dotfiles/settings. I am running it in terminal (in tmux, in bash, over SSH, on Ubuntu, iTerm2 being my emulator).

If I open a file, e.g. emacs init.el, and immediately press DOWN, the B persists. If I don't press anything right away, nothing gets inserted.

So it looks like nothing is going on. If my mark isn't at the beginning of the buffer, the B is inserted there, I think (it is harder to reproduce this).

Any help would be MUCH appreciated. My repos are littered with commit messages like "ARGH THE B OF DOOM STRIKES AGAINaskdjasdq".

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Is this just in emacs, or do you get the B-of-doom in other editors as well? –  Marc B Jul 9 '12 at 20:13
    
Do you mean "66" rather than "11"? Because 'B' == 66 in ASCII. (Even if you were using hex values, it'd be 0x42, not 0x11.) –  JAB Jul 9 '12 at 20:14
2  
Does this behavior occur in a graphical Emacs session? Does it occur outside of a tmux window? I seem to recall once having a similar issue some years ago; the culprit ultimately proved to be readline and was resolved with some modifications to my global inputrc and possibly termcap settings. Sadly, this was so long ago that I don't remember the details. If you could isolate the source of the problem more exactly by eliminating some of the other programs involved (like testing outside of tmux and in a different shell and terminal emulator, if possible), that might help. –  Greg E. Jul 9 '12 at 20:25
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Brilliant, it appears to not occur outside tmux. Can you further recall anything you did? –  Isaac Jul 9 '12 at 20:29
1  
Tangentially, you should always check what you are about to commit, even if you don't suffer from some unwanted insertion problem. Your "B of doom" would be easily spotted in a diff and fixed before you committed it. –  phils Jul 9 '12 at 22:54

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