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There are 2 tables:

Employee
(id_employee, worker_name)

Groups
(id_employee, group_name)

Here is creation script for you:

CREATE TABLE Employee (
   id_employee int identity(1,1) NOT NULL CONSTRAINT PK_Employee PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED,
   worker_name nvarchar(100) CONSTRAINT UQ_Employee_worker_name UNIQUE
);

CREATE TABLE Groups (
   id_employee int NOT NULL CONSTRAINT FK_Groups_id_employee FOREIGN KEY REFERENCES Employee (id_employee),
   group_name varchar(10) NOT NULL,
   CONSTRAINT PK_Groups PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED (group_name, id_employee)
);

INSERT Employee
SELECT 'worker 1'
UNION ALL SELECT 'worker 2'
UNION ALL SELECT 'worker 3'
UNION ALL SELECT 'worker 4';

INSERT Groups
SELECT 1, 'a1'
UNION ALL SELECT 2, 'a1'
UNION ALL SELECT 3, 'a2'
UNION ALL SELECT 4, 'a2'
UNION ALL SELECT 1, 'b1'
UNION ALL SELECT 2, 'b1'
UNION ALL SELECT 3, 'b2'
UNION ALL SELECT 4, 'b2'
UNION ALL SELECT 2, 'b3'
UNION ALL SELECT 3, 'b3'
UNION ALL SELECT 4, 'b3';

I need a query that for a given id_group will return all other groups that have exactly the same employees.

For example:

SELECT for 'a1'

-> Should return 'b1' because in both groups there are: worker 1 & worker 2

SELECT for 'a2'

-> Should return 'b2' because in both groups there are: worker 3 & worker 4

Note that groups need to be exactly the same, all members of a1 need to be in b1 and size of both groups need to be the same as well.

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2  
So, what have you tried so far? –  Gumbo Jul 9 '12 at 22:03
1  
Can you have duplicates in the groups table? –  Gordon Linoff Jul 9 '12 at 22:04
    
Which DBMS are you using? –  Zane Bien Jul 9 '12 at 22:14
    
I am using sql server 2005 –  Monowar Jul 9 '12 at 22:18
    
Please answer the question about duplicates in the groups table? –  ErikE Jul 9 '12 at 23:59
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5 Answers 5

You can use SQL set operations to do the work. The idea is to match employees together within groups and to count the totals in the groups.

select others.group_name
from (select g.*, count(*) over (partition by group_name) as numemps
      from groups g
      where group_name <> @group
     ) others left outer join
     (select g.*, count(*) over (partition by group_name) as numemps
      from groups g
      where group_name = @group
     ) thegroup
     on others.id_employee = thegroup.id_employee and
        others.numemps = thegroup.numemps
group by others.group_name
having count(*) = max(thegroup.numemps) and
       max(case when thegroup.id_employee is null then 1 else 0 end) = 0

So, this query divides the world into two . . . your group and all the other groups. It then matches them by name and aggregates by groups. The only candidate groups are the ones with the same numbers of employees.

The having clause chooses the groups that match. This means that every name in the other group matches a name in the group you care about. Since the sizes of the groups are the same, and each name in your group is matched, the groups contain the same employees.

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This one works well. Nice. –  Holger Brandt Jul 9 '12 at 23:02
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You can try this solution:

SELECT b.group_name
FROM
(
    SELECT aa.id_employee, aa.group_name, bb.group_count
    FROM groups aa
    CROSS JOIN
    (
        SELECT COUNT(1) AS group_count FROM groups WHERE group_name = 'a1'  
    ) bb
    WHERE aa.group_name = 'a1'
) a
INNER JOIN groups b ON a.id_employee = b.id_employee AND a.group_name <> b.group_name
INNER JOIN
(
    SELECT group_name, COUNT(1) AS other_group_count
    FROM groups
    GROUP BY group_name
) c ON b.group_name = c.group_name
WHERE a.group_count = c.other_group_count
GROUP BY b.group_name, a.group_count
HAVING COUNT(1) = a.group_count
share|improve this answer
    
Looks pretty good except the case where there is an employee 5 in group b1. It returns b1 even though a1 has 2 employees and b1 has 3 employees. –  Holger Brandt Jul 9 '12 at 22:30
    
@HolgerBrandt, oops, just realized that. Check my revised solution; that should work. –  Zane Bien Jul 9 '12 at 22:36
    
This will always return groups which contain other groups as matching –  podiluska Jul 9 '12 at 22:46
    
@ZaneBien, if employee '5' is in group b1 and group 'b1' is chosen, it returns a1 as a result even though a1 has 2 employees and b1 has 3. Clever use of grouping and counting though. –  Holger Brandt Jul 9 '12 at 22:51
    
@HolgerBrandt, while seemingly easy, your problem was quite the challenge! I'm pretty sure I've got it right now. You don't need to use variables on this one like you do with others, and is also DBMS-agnostic. –  Zane Bien Jul 9 '12 at 23:03
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It took a few edits to get the one I wanted

with pairs as (
    select gs1.group_name as group1, gs2.group_name as group2, gs1.emp_count as emp_count
    from
    (select group_name, count(1) as emp_count from groups group by group_name) as gs1 inner join
    (select group_name, count(1) as emp_count from groups group by group_name) as gs2
        /* choose parameterized */
        --on gs1.group_name = 'a1' and gs1.group_name != gs2.group_name and gs1.emp_count = gs2.emp_count
        /* or all pairs */
        on gs1.group_name < gs2.group_name and gs1.emp_count = gs2.emp_count
)
select
    pairs.group1, pairs.group2
from
    pairs inner join

    (select group_name, id_employee from Groups) as g1
        on g1.group_name = pairs.group1 inner join

    (select group_name, id_employee from Groups) as g2
        on g2.group_name = pairs.group2 and g1.id_employee = g2.id_employee
group by
    pairs.group1, pairs.group2
having
    min(pairs.emp_count) = count(g1.group_name);
share|improve this answer
    
The other queries aren't adaptable to returning all pairs. You also need to refer to the parameter twice or more in the others. Sometimes that's more useful that you might think. It doesn't need analytic functions either. –  shawnt00 Jul 9 '12 at 23:56
    
Referring to the parameter twice? When is it more useful than I think? –  ErikE Jul 10 '12 at 0:18
    
First of all, I'm not knocking anybody's code and it usually doesn't matter. But I have also worked on systems that had reporting features where parameter markers were replaced with user-supplied values. They didn't have the ability to map the same input to multiple places in the query. For another scenario, suppose you're calling through ADO.Net from a client app. Some systems require repeating the parameter info for each instance. I think Oracle and DBase are good examples. The errors can seem very mysterious if you don't know to watch out for that. –  shawnt00 Jul 10 '12 at 1:07
    
That's easy to deal with: WITH Param AS (SELECT @groupname GroupName) SELECT ... WHERE group_name <> (SELECT GroupName FROM Param) AND EXISTS (SELECT ... WHERE group_name = (SELECT GroupName FROM Param) ) –  ErikE Jul 10 '12 at 17:14
    
Agreed. I wrote my version with a cte because it sort of breaks out the logic. It's easy to change if necessary to fit into a older system but that might be a disadvantage to somebody. I'm just pointing out minor differences and not suggesting there's a single best way to do it. –  shawnt00 Jul 10 '12 at 18:05
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This works. See the setup script I added to the question if you want to try it.

SELECT DISTINCT G.group_name
FROM Groups G
WHERE
   G.group_name <> @group
   AND NOT EXISTS (
      SELECT *
      FROM
         (SELECT * FROM Groups WHERE group_name = @group) G1
         FULL JOIN (SELECT * FROM Groups WHERE G.group_name = group_name) G2
            ON G1.id_employee = G2.id_employee
      WHERE EXISTS (SELECT G1.id_employee EXCEPT SELECT G2.id_employee)
   );
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Here is the sql query to get the desired result.

DECLARE @group_name varchar(10)='a1'
;WITH CTE(group_name,emp_ids) as (select group_name,(SELECT  cast(id_employee as varchar(10))+ ', ' as [text()]
    FROM    Groups where group_name=g.group_name 
    ORDER BY id_employee DESC
    FOR XML PATH('') )  as emp_ids from Groups g group by group_name)

SELECT group_name FROM CTE where emp_ids in(select emp_ids from CTE where group_name = @group_name)
and group_name <> @group_name 
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