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If I have a file:

aaa / new replacement line
AAA / old target line
random line
random line 
BBB / old target line
CCC / old target line

In this example there are 4 replacements, so the final file should end up like:

aaa / new replacement line
aaa / new replacement line
random line
random line 
aaa / new replacement line
aaa / new replacement line

I have an attempt at an answer below but would like to see your input on this also. Maybe there is a more successful 'vim golf' approach I am unaware of. Maybe I'm just being really dumb and there is a simple command for this.

Basically, the question is this: if I have a line yanked into a register, how do I completely replace searched lines matching 'old target line'?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Use 0y$ to yank your replacement line - this won't include the newline.

Then use:

%s/.*old target line.*/\=@"

To replace the target lines with the contents of the unnamed register, which will contain the last yank.

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Sweet, that's way more efficient than before! –  Kevin Lee Jul 9 '12 at 23:01

I first grab the 'aaa / new replacement line' by using "aY, save into register a

Then I remove the carriage return using the following, from remove newlines from a register in vim?:

:let @a=substitute(strtrans(@a),'\^@',' ','g')

Or, I can simply use visual selection with v and grab the line without the return (this is much easier).

I can then use the global command to perform the replacement:

:g/old target line/s/.*/\=@a
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One improvement is that I should use visual selection mode v and yank the line, hence removing the remove newlines from a register step. –  Kevin Lee Jul 9 '12 at 22:12

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