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I have a basic questions regarding functional programming in R.

Given a function that returns a list, such as:

myF <- function(x){
   return (list(a=11,b=x))
}

why is it that the list returned when calling the function with a range or vector is always the same lenght for 'a' Ex:

myF(1:10)

returns:

$a
[1] 11

$b
[1]  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10

How can one change the behavior so that the 'a' list has the sample length as b's.

I am actually working with a bunch of S4 objects that do I cannot easily convert to list (using as.list) so _apply is not my first choice.

Thanks for any insight or help!

EDIT (Added further explanations) I am not necessarily looking to just pad 'a' to makes its length equal to b's. However using the solution as.list(data.frame(a=myA,b=x)) pads the 'a' with the same value computed first.

myF <- function(x){
  myA = ceiling(runif(1, max=100))
  return (as.list(data.frame(a=myA
               ,b=x)))
}

myF(1:5)
$a
 [1] 79 79 79 79 79 79 79 79 79 79

$b
 [1]  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10

I still am not sure why that happens!

Thanks

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1  
Isn't what you want actually a data frame, constructed with data.frame? –  Tilo Wiklund Jul 9 '12 at 22:14
    
Could you specify exactly what values you want the "rest" of $a to have? –  Tilo Wiklund Jul 9 '12 at 22:53
    
@mandy, your recent edit has not clarified what you're looking for in 'a.' Do you want a to be random integers, not necessarily repeated? –  mac Jul 9 '12 at 23:15
    
@mac, yes a random for example! –  mandy Jul 9 '12 at 23:22
    
You got the same value (79) repeated multiple times because you only asked runif to provide you with one random value. –  joran Jul 9 '12 at 23:22

4 Answers 4

are you just looking to have 11 repeated so that a is the same length as b? if so:

> myF <- function(x){
+    return (list(a=rep(11,length(x)),b=x))
+ }
> myF(1:10)
$a
 [1] 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11

$b
 [1]  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10

EDIT based on OP's clarification/comments. If you want 'a' to instead be a random vector with length equal to 'b':

> myF <- function(x){
+    return (list(a=ceiling(runif(length(x),max=100)),b=x))
+ }
> myF(1:10)
$a
 [1]  4 31  8 45 25 74 36 95 64 32

$b
 [1]  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10
share|improve this answer
    
I am actually beginning with R and I am mostly interested in understanding why it does not work and also having a solution to that. Thanks –  mandy Jul 9 '12 at 22:27
1  
A list in R isn't forced to have the same number of elements in each member of the list, so if that's the behavior you want, you need to make it explicit. I think this is why @Tilo suggested using a data.frame, with columns a and b. data.frames must have the same number of elements in each row/column. –  mac Jul 9 '12 at 22:39
    
Make sense Mac. But what In my case, X is an S4 object that I am passing and the value for one of its methods is always 1. –  mandy Jul 9 '12 at 22:54

I don't quite understand what you mean by not being able to use as.list. You should be able to get a version of your function satisfying the requirement that all components of the list be equally long by doing:

myF <- function(x){
   return as.list(data.frame(a=11,b=x))
}

EDIT: The reason list does not work the way you expect is that list applied to a number of lists/vectors/e.t.c. is just that, a list of those lists/vectors/e.t.c.; it does not "inspect" their structure.

What I think you want is the additional semantics that the vectors contained in the list should match up and produce a set of "rows", each with one corresponding element from each one of your vectors. This is exactly what a data frame is suppose to be (indeed how, I think, a data frame is represented in R). The final as.list call does little but change what type its tagged as.

EDIT2: Note that if I'm wrong above (and that's not the general behaviour you want) then Mac's solution is more appropriate, as it gives you exactly the behaviour that both the vectors should have the same length, without implying that they should "line up".

This would both be confusing to anyone reading the code (as using a data.frame implies you think of your vectors as matching up) as well as forcing any additional elements you add to the list to be converted into vectors of the appropriate length (which may or may not be what you want)

share|improve this answer
    
Tilo! What I meant is that I needed to call myF using myF(range) and not some version of apply. Your suggestion work perfectly for me, Thanks! Could you please explain why as.list(a=11,b=x) does not work... I still cannot figure out why it does not work! –  mandy Jul 9 '12 at 22:25
    
Added a section explaining the difference between list and data.frame, hope that clarifies things. –  Tilo Wiklund Jul 9 '12 at 22:38
    
Your explanation makes total sense tilo, however, there is something I am still missing. See my Edit to the first post. Thanks –  mandy Jul 9 '12 at 22:45

In case I did not understand you correctly last time, here is another possibility:

If you want to generate a second vector, given some function/expression, of the same length as your argument you could do something like:

myF <- function(x){
   return (list(a=replicate(length(x),f),b=x))
}

in your example f could be runif(1, max=100), though in the specific case of runif you could explicitly tell it to generate a vector of appropriate length by calling runif(length(x), max=100) inside the function.

replicate simply re-evaluates f the number of times you request, and gives you the vector of all the results.

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It appears that your function is "hard coding" a. So no matter what you specify it will always give 11.

If for example you changed the function to:

myF <- function(x){    return (list(a=x,b=x)) }

myF(1:10) 

$a
 [1]  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10

$b
 [1]  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10

a is allowed to change like b.

or

myF <- function(x,y){    return (list(a=y,b=x)) }

myF(10:1,1:10) 
$a
 [1]  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10

$b
 [1] 10  9  8  7  6  5  4  3  2  1

Now a is allowed to change independent of b.

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