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I'm working on the project where the client has the back-end code in ServerA, and my front-end code, which is supposed to talk to back-end via AJAX requests is on ServerB, and they are in different domains. Because of the same origin policy, I'm not able to make those requests successfully (neither POST nor GET). Is it possible to enable it somehow without changing the back-end code to handle the JSONP? eg., white list that particular domain, or something?

I tried to emulate this in my local network where the back-end code is running on 10.0.1.4 (different machine), and I'm accessing it from localhost (apache), but couldn't figure out anything that doesn't require using jsonp. When calls are made, I'm not even seeing anything in the logs in the back-end, but it works fine from the REST client and by just loading the URL for GET requests. How are public API requests implemented that are not using JSONP?

I need at least one method (POST or GET) to work. Thanks.

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It's called Proxy. –  Bergi Jul 9 '12 at 22:17
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up vote 4 down vote accepted

Is it possible to enable it somehow without changing the back-end code to handle the JSONP? eg., white list that particular domain, or something?

Yes, you could write a server side script on your domain that will serve as a bridge between your and the remote domain and then send an AJAX request to your script.

Don't expect miracles. If you don't have control over the remote domain you are busted. The same origin policy restriction that's built into browsers for security reasons busts you. Well, you could always write your own browser that doesn't implement this policy, but I think you get my point.

Common workarounds include JSONP and CORS but they involve control over the remote domain. If you don't have control then read the my previous sentence as well as my first sentence.

Here's a nice guide I invite you consulting that covers some common techniques allowing to achieve cross domain AJAX with jQuery. Then adapt the one that fits best your scenario. And there's always the heavy artillery solution that involves bridging the 2 domains with a server side script which works bullet-proof in 100% of the cases if none of the other workarounds help you.

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Does that mean I can write my own server-side code, which acts like a bridge to the actual back-end code? My HTML <=> My back-end <=> Client's back-end –  shershams Jul 9 '12 at 22:32
    
That's exactly what I meant. –  Darin Dimitrov Jul 9 '12 at 22:32
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Is it possible to enable it somehow without changing the back-end code to handle the JSONP? eg., white list that particular domain, or something?

Hmmm, mostly no. You must allow JSONP or "white list" things via CORS (which is very easy to do). Or you can use YQL as a cross-domain proxy.

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Three solutions posted here:

http://devlog.info/2010/03/10/cross-domain-ajax/

I've tried the third option since it just worked for me.. and I didn't have to go through any extra stress as it just handled things just like a regular ajax call.

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