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Hierarchy

\Folder1
    cpu.h
    cpu.c
    sources
\Folder2
    mem.h
    mem.c
    sources
dirs

cpu.h

...
#define nope 0
...
int chuckTesta(unsigned int a);
....

cpu.c

#include <cpu.h>
int chuckTesta(unsigned int a){ ... }

mem.c

#include <cpu.h> // A
extern int chuckTesta(unsigned int a); // B

cout << nope << endl; // C
cout << chuckTesta(1); // D

Is there a way to link cpu.lib to the files within Folder2 and satisfy these requirements?

  • Remove line A
  • Line C and D still work
  • Compiles and links with no warnings (right now I'm either getting unresolved external symbol, or definition errors)

Note: Folder2's sources file only compiles the files within Folder2, and has Folder1 as an include path. Similarly with Folder1. Each create a .lib file, cpu.lib and mem.lib respectively.

I'm using LINK, CL, and building for Windows8.

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem with removing line A is #define nope 0. If you convert the define to a static integer (or add one) in cpu.lib it should work. Just make sure you link to both cpu.lib and mem.lib in the final executable.

cpu.h

...
#define nope 0
static int cpu_nope = nope;
...
int chuckTesta(unsigned int a);
....

mem.c

extern int chuckTesta(unsigned int a);
extern int cpu_nope;

cout << cpu_nope << endl;
cout << chuckTesta(1);
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