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So my computer has a lot of errors. 99% of the time, they're caused by explorer.exe being stupid. I can manually stop them, but I was thinking that I may be able to set up a schedule that automatically stops and starts it every 10 or so minutes, so I never have any problems with it any more. The code I have doesn't work, but I'll put it anyway:

foreach (System.Diagnostics.Process myProc in System.Diagnostics.Process.GetProcesses())
        {
            if (myProc.ProcessName == "explorer.exe")
            {
                myProc.Kill();
            }
        }

When I run it, absolutely nothing happens. Visual studio doesn't give an error, the program doesn't crash, etc. It just does nothing.

share|improve this question
3  
Ensure you're running it as an administrator, and use GetProcessesByName instead of your current check. Further, I would recommend against doing this. – user1479055 Jul 9 '12 at 22:47
3  
Better spend time on fixing the issues instead of restarting explorer.exe all the time... – ThiefMaster Jul 9 '12 at 22:48
1  
That's kind of a core Windows process -- seems like you might be doing something stupid or, more likely (and more nice of me), you have a virus. – Austin Salonen Jul 9 '12 at 22:48
    
You really ought to learn how to use the essential tools any programmer uses to get his job done. Debugger first, so you'll see that Kill() is never called. Sysinternal's AutoRuns utility next so you can disable the shell extensions that destabilize explorer. – Hans Passant Jul 9 '12 at 23:47

Please avoid use of the for-if anti-pattern:

var explorers = Process.GetProcessesByName("explorer");
foreach (var thisExplorer in explorers)
{
    thisExplorer.Kill();
}

edit: as charmander noted in comments.

share|improve this answer

It's usually a good idea to look at the output of a partucular method/property before assuming you know what it contains.

In this case, myProc.ProcessName does not contain the extension of the process. So compare to "explorer".

Additionally, modifying a collection whilst foreaching over it usually results in a runtime error.

share|improve this answer
    
I do not believe that the OP is actually modifying the collection, sure they are affecting an object in it, but the collection itself is not being modified. – Stefan H Jul 9 '12 at 23:02
    
@StefanH: I have not performed the research - I do not know how that collection is maintained. If its just a snapshot of the current process list, then you would be correct. If there some kind of black-majik-voodoo-hoodoo that keeps the list in sync with the current process list, then woe be unto the foreacher. – Sam Axe Jul 9 '12 at 23:45

The process name is just "explorer"

EDIT: This did the trick on my box:

foreach (System.Diagnostics.Process myProc in System.Diagnostics.Process.GetProcesses())
        {
            if (myProc.ProcessName == "explorer")
            {
                myProc.Kill();
            }
        }
share|improve this answer
1  
When I only use explorer, It restarts immeditally after ending. Sounds great, but it gives me this error right after it runs, which may get annoying: i.imgur.com/QaKGZ.jpg%22 – Minicl55 Jul 9 '12 at 22:52
1  
An equality check is a lot safer. I could easily imagine a process that happens to include the word "explorer" in its name, which would be unnecessarily killed here. – dlev Jul 9 '12 at 22:53
    
@dlev I was not suggesting that he use .contains, I was just showing that it grabbed the correct application. – Stefan H Jul 9 '12 at 22:53
    
@StefanH Even so, when you say "this worked for me" followed by a code snippet, you are endorsing that snippet (unless you indicate otherwise.) – dlev Jul 9 '12 at 22:54
    
@dlev Updated it to do equality. I was in part posting that in case systems other than Windows 7 did it differently, the OP could have debugged and seen what the process name that the code stopped on is, and then update it to use equality instead. Rather than the OP trying exactly what i had and then it have the same behavior as before. – Stefan H Jul 9 '12 at 22:58

You can do it the Linq way too

List<Process> processes = Process.GetProcesses().Where(p => p.ProcessName == "explorer").ToList();

foreach (var process in processes)
{
  process.Kill();
}
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