Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm a little new to reflection so forgive me if this is a more basic question I'm writing a program in c# and am trying to write a generic Empty or null checker method so far the code reads as

 public static class EmptyNull
    {
       public static bool EmptyNullChecker(Object o)
       {
           try
           {
               var ob = (object[]) o;
               if (ob == null || !ob.Any())
                   return true;
           }
           catch (Exception e)// i could use genercs to figure out if this a array but                  //figured i just catch the exception
           {Console.WriteLine(e);}
           try
           {
               if (o.GetType().GetGenericTypeDefinition().Equals("System.Collections.Generic.List`1[T]"))
               //the following line is where the code goes haywire
              var ob = (List<o.GetType().GetGenericArguments()[0].ReflectedType>)o;
               if (ob == null || !ob.Any())
                   return true;
           }
           catch (Exception e)
           { Console.WriteLine(e); }
           return o == null || o.ToString().Equals("");//the only thing that can return "" after a toString() is a string that ="", if its null will return objects placeMarker
       }
    }

now obviously the for a list i need a way to figure out what type of generic list it is so i want to use reflection to figure it out and then cast it with that reflection is this possible

Thank You

share|improve this question
    
Whatever else you do, move the test for null to top. You have all sorts of null dereferencing right now. –  Miserable Variable Jul 9 '12 at 23:57
    
Where are these objects coming from that you've lost all type information? –  bmm6o Jul 10 '12 at 0:00
    
anywhere i dont really care its just a generic method that i can use all over my program to quickly figure out if this object that im dealing with is empty or null -- instead of writing out a check for every specific item i am using –  Alex Krups Jul 10 '12 at 0:02
add comment

3 Answers

If all you want is a single method that returns true if an object is null or if the object is an empty enumerable, I wouldn't use reflection for that. How about a couple of extension methods? I think it would be cleaner:

public static class Extensions
{
    public static bool IsNullOrEmpty(this object obj)
    {
        return obj == null;
    }

    public static bool IsNullOrEmpty<T>(this IEnumerable<T> obj)
    {
        return obj == null || !obj.Any();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
cant because ill be using this for list of standard objects alsosuch as list<string> –  Alex Krups Jul 10 '12 at 0:47
    
@AlexKrups: sorry, not sure if I follow what the problem is. List<string> objects can be passed in with this. –  Chris Sinclair Jul 10 '12 at 0:52
    
List<string> implements IEnumerable<T>, so it will work with this code, as will any other class that implements the interface. In this case, you really need to let the type system work for you, instead of trying to cover all your bases with reflection. Don't reinvent the square wheel. –  FishBasketGordo Jul 10 '12 at 1:56
add comment

If you're using .NET 4, you can take IEnumerable<out T>'s new support for covariance into account, and write this as:

public static bool EmptyNullChecker(Object o)
{
    IEnumerable<object> asCollection = o as IEnumerable<object>;
    return o != null && asCollection != null && !asCollection.Any(); 
}

I would, however, suggest a better name such as one inspired by string.IsNullOrEmpty

share|improve this answer
    
This would work for reference types, but not value types. –  Siege Jul 10 '12 at 0:41
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.