Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a really weird problem using ASP.NET/C# 4.0 that I haven't been able to find an answer to. I have a custom base master page for my child master pages, and a custom base page class for my pages. My problem is that if I access the Master member from any of my pages, the page content itself doesn't get rendered, only the master pages.

So, to recap in a different way: "Master Page" inherits System.Web.UI.MasterPage "Nested Master" using "Master Page" inherits System.Web.UI.MasterPage

"WebForm" using "Nested Master", WebForm is inheriting CustomPageBase which inherits System.Web.UI.Page

When CustomBaseMaster accesses this.Master it will not render the webform's content, only the "Nested Master" and "Master Page" content. I have tried it with only reading a member, writing a member, and both reading and writing, and not even accessing a member, just calling Debug.WriteLine(this.Master)

If it helps any, I am using a Page Decorator on "WebForm" that needs to update the controls on the "Master Page"

Unfortunately, my google searching queries show up with results on how to access public members of the Master Page. But nothing I could find would help explain why, when accessing the master page, it results in the page's content not displaying.

Has anybody seen anything like that and can offer any suggestions? Google hasn't been much help, been searching for a couple of hours now.

share|improve this question

Ok, turns out when using the Page decorator at the top of the class it assigns the properties of the page class before PreInit completes. I used ILSpy to look at what happens when you access the Master property of the page, if it is accessed before the Master page has been created (internally null) and before all of the PreInit methods are called, it will create a new master page and uses that content. Kind of annoying. Anyways, my solution was to not make the properties bubble up the values to the parent master pages on getting and setting them, but overloaded the OnLoad event in my base page and base master classes, and set the properties on the parents there.

So, instead of doing this:

namespace MyWebsite
{
    public abstract class MyPageBase : Page
    {
        public int PropertyName
        {
            get
            {
                return ((MyMaster)this.Master).RatePageId;
            }
            set
            {
                ((MyMaster)this.Master).RatePageId;
            }
        }
    }
}

I did this:

namespace MyWebsite
{
    public abstract class MyPageBase : Page
    {
        public int? PropertyName
        {
            get;
            set;
        }

        protected override void OnInit(EventArgs e)
        {
            base.OnInit(e);

            if (PropertyName != null)
            {
                ((MyMaster)this.Master).PropertyName = PropertyName.Value;
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.