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I'm creating a software for math problems. As you know, there are many types of math problems.

In my software, some problems are gotten from an Xml file (repository) and anothers can be generated by a factory (random numbers, you know).

For example, if I'm creating binary problems as additions, if I choose the first option I can have a class where get thre file and choose some of them. Or if I choose the second one, I can generate the problems as random:

x = random.Next(y, z);
y = random.Next(y, z);

return new BinaryProblem(x, y);

Something like that.

So I've developed right now this design, I guess I've builded a strategy pattern.

public interface IProblemService
{
    IEnumerable<Problem> GetProblems();
}

public class ProblemService : IProblemService
{
    private readonly IService service;

    public ProblemService(IService service)
    {
        this.service = service;
    }

    public IService Service
    {
        get { return service; }
    }

    public IEnumerable<Problem> GetProblems()
    {
        return this.service.GetProblems();
    }
}

/* =====================================================*/
CONCRETE CLASSES

public interface IService
{
    IEnumerable<Problem> GetProblems();
}

// When I want to generate random problems
public abstract class FactoryService : IService
{
    public IEnumerable<Problem> GetProblems();
    public abstract Generate();
}

// When I want to get problems through a XML file
public class RepositoryService : IService
{
    public abstract IEnumerable<Problem> GetProblems();
    void Submit(IEnumerable<Problem> problems);
}

In the service I put IService as public because, I need to know if the service is a factory or repository. In the case this will be a repository, I'd submit some problems to the file.

I'm not convinced of the design. I guess I'm being redundant and this is not the best way to do it.

Can you give your opinnion or ideas to improve it?

EDIT: What I meant with the first option is:

    public IEnumerable<Problem> GetProblems()
    {
        if (model == null)
        {
            model = new List<Problem>();

            // Dummy Data.
            model.Add(new SimplifyProblem() { Id = "1", Expression = "8 ÷ 2 x 5 ÷ 10", Result1 = 2 });
            model.Add(new SimplifyProblem() { Id = "2", Expression = "20 ÷ 2 x 5 - 2", Result1 = 48 });
            model.Add(new SimplifyProblem() { Id = "3", Expression = "15 ÷ 5 + 3", Result1 = 6 });
            model.Add(new SimplifyProblem() { Id = "4", Expression = "6 + 4² ÷ 8 - 2", Result1 = 6 });
            model.Add(new SimplifyProblem() { Id = "5", Expression = "8 + 2 x 4", Result1 = 40 });
            model.Add(new SimplifyProblem() { Id = "6", Expression = "8 + 4 x (5 - 3)", Result1 = 16 });
            model.Add(new SimplifyProblem() { Id = "7", Expression = "8 - 3 + 5", Result1 = 10 });
            // ...
        }

        return model;
    }
share|improve this question
    
How about considering specific problem (repository) a special case of random problem? The random problem also need description besides the random number part, right? –  nhahtdh Jul 10 '12 at 3:49
    
Yes, it is, like a configuration.. I ommit that –  Darf Zon Jul 10 '12 at 3:53
    
What I meant is that, you can put the problem through a "pipeline": first fetch from XML, then generate random problem. Then you don't need 2 classes extending IService interface. –  nhahtdh Jul 10 '12 at 3:56
    
@nhahtdh Please, check the update. With the XmlFile, I've get some stored problems, not to generate random problems –  Darf Zon Jul 10 '12 at 4:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm not sure why you have two separate interfaces, IProblemService and IService; to me, it seems like they do the same thing.

I would separate the generation of random problems (the "factory" part) from the class that actually returns the problems (the "repository" part):

public interface IProblemRepository {
  IEnumerable<Problem> LoadProblems();
}

public class XmlProblemRepository : IProblemRepository {
  ...
}

public class InMemoryProblemRepository : IProblemRepository {
  private readonly IEnumerable<Problem> problems;

  public InMemoryProblemRepository(IEnumerable<Problem> problems) {
    this.problems = problems;
  }

  public IEnumerable<Problem> LoadProblems() {
    return problems;
  }
}

public class RandomProblemFactory {
  public IEnumerable<Problem> GenerateProblems(int count) {
    ...
  }
}

Then you can either load from an XML file:

repository = new XmlProblemRepository("problems.xml");

or you can generate problems using the factory and source them from an in-memory repository:

factory = new RandomProblemFactory();
problems = factory.GenerateProblems(10);
repository = new InMemoryProblemRepository(problems);
share|improve this answer
    
Anyway, I've added some information about the repository option (first one) –  Darf Zon Jul 10 '12 at 4:04
    
Note that my use of "repository" is somewhat different though. IProblemRepository is more like your original IProblemService. –  casablanca Jul 10 '12 at 4:05
    
I like this idea, which I was planning is to store this one in a container and I'm almost that with this design, I can accomplishing.. also, I'm declaring abstract classes like XmlProblemRep.. and FactoryPro.. with abstract methods. –  Darf Zon Jul 10 '12 at 4:30

It looks like you want to have different sources for problems (Xml file, database, memory) and make your code persistence-ignorant. If so, I wouldn't implement IService interface in the factory class. Keep factory only for random problem generation. I would add Submit to the interface:

public interface IService
{
    IEnumerable<Problem> GetProblems();
    void Submit(IEnumerable<Problem>);
}

The XmlRepositoryService class would get / save data from / to the Xml file:

public class XmlRepositoryService : IService
{
    public IEnumerable<Problem> GetProblems()
    {
      //get the problems from the Xml file
    }

    public void Submit(IEnumerable<Problem> problems)
    {
      //save problems to the xml file
    }
}

The in-memory repository class would store a list of problems:

public class MemoryRepositoryService : IService
{
    private List<Problem> problemList = new List<Problem>();

    public IEnumerable<Problem> GetProblems()
    {
      return problemList;
    }

    public void Submit(IEnumerable<Problem> problems)
    {
      problemList.AddRange(problems.ToList());
    }
}

The ProblemFactory class would have the GenerateRandom method only:

public class ProblemFactory
{
  public static Problem GenerateRandom()
  {
    var x = random.Next(y, z);
    var y = random.Next(y, z);

    return new BinaryProblem(x, y);
  }
}

To use it, just instantiate a repository class, generate a problem, add it to a list and submit the list to the repository:

var problems = new List<Problems>();
var problem = ProblemFactory.GenerateRandom();
problems.Add(problem);
var repository = new MemoryRepositoryService(); //or XmlRepositoryService
repository.Submit(problems);
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