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Let's say for an instance I have this function:

function isValid($premise){
    if($premise == 'foo')
    {
        return true;
    }

    return false;
}

As you can see the else statement was omitted, else it was immediately followed by the return statement. Why do some people omit them? Is it a bad programming practice?

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1  
I think it should be stated that this only works because of the return statements, without them omitting else will not produce the same results. And for that I think it is good practice to include the else statement just to be clear on what you intend to do. – vikki Jul 10 '12 at 5:18
up vote 5 down vote accepted

The same code will be generated with or without the missing else. It's a matter of style and preference.

Personally I would tend to omit the else only when checking for certain conditions at the start of a long function.

I do not consider it bad practice. There are situations where it makes for clearer code.

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The behavior and runtime is exactly the same in both cases - it is purely a stylistic choice.

Maybe try programmers.stackexchange.com for further discussion on which style is better.

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Is it a bad programming practice? – Michelle Jul 10 '12 at 4:54
1  
In my opinion it is usually best to include an else (or elseif) especially when nesting logic, so that the control flow is clear. That's just my opinion though - your goal should be to a) do whatever makes the code easiest to understand and b) stay reasonably consistent. So in this case, think about which you think is more clear and stay consistent with that choice throughout your project's code. – Cam Jul 10 '12 at 5:09

because return terminates/breaks the function.

Suppse if if condition executes then it terminates the function by returning true. and if if don't run then it will continue returning false.

In your code

function isValid($premise){
    if($premise == 'foo')
    {
        return true;//terminated the function and no more function is going to run
    }

    return false;//if it is running then it is very clear that if condition has not run because if it would have run then the if condition didn't run    }
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