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This is an extension of this question (which I asked previously):

How to delete every other row, plus paste deleted results after selection?

, but now I want to generalize to n-striped data

So a extension of this question would be- how would one generalize this to unstriping datasets?

Clearly, the above is effectively a 2-row destriping with every other row but what if we wanted to effectively sort the data in this pattern below, to a 3-row destripe? N-row destripe?

BEFORE:

111
222
333
444
555
666

NEW AFTER (if using 2-stripes):

111
333
555
222
444
666

NEW AFTER (3-stripes are resorted like below) :

111
444
222
555
333
666

There may be an algorithm name for this; I don't have a strong background in sorting but there's likely a name for it- if anyone can clarify please inform me.

Again, macro (or not) with parameter is what I'm trying to do for a solution here. This may also be effective in the sorting utility space, but based on the answer to the previous question, I think it's viable in vimscript.

So what I would fashion for a script is something like (make a visual line selection on the data), and then call a user-macro function like

:'<','>' call Destripe(2)
:'<','>' call Destripe(3)

where the lone parameter describes the striping.

Another example (to be clearer in what I was trying to do), if I have 3 stripes of data

BEFORE (LHS) & AFTER (RHS):

aaa        aaa
bbb        aaa
ccc        aaa
aaa        bbb
bbb        bbb
ccc        bbb
aaa        ccc
bbb        ccc
ccc        ccc

An example with 2-stripe data

BEFORE (LHS) & AFTER (RHS):

aaa        aaa
bbb        aaa
aaa        aaa
bbb        bbb
aaa        bbb
bbb        bbb

Thanks to @lornix for the idea

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

To be honest, if this isn't something to be done frequently, or if there aren't too many stripes, I'd just type the following at the command line (for three stripes). Maybe you can see how this could be generalised.

:let @a = '' | let @b = ''
:g/^/ +d A | d B
:put a | put b
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This is a better answer. Far easier than what I was trying to do with my script. I think the script is useful when handling more than 5 stripes (as it would be more an issue of generalizing to a variable context) For others that may care, if there were 4 stripes we'd do: :let @a = '' | let @b = '' | let @c = '' :g/^/ +d A | d B | d C :put a | put b | put c –  Kevin Lee Jul 12 '12 at 22:38
"
function! Destripe(stripe) range
    call setpos('.',[0,a:firstline,1,0])
    let numlines=(a:lastline-a:firstline+1)/a:stripe
    let currentline=a:firstline+a:stripe-1
    while numlines > 0
        call setpos('.',[0,currentline,1,0])
        let currentline=currentline+a:stripe-1
        silent :.m$
        let numlines=numlines-1
    endwhile
endfunction
"
%call Destripe(2)

Sourcing the above on a 111,222,333... list of lines, gives the following: (doubled up to save space)

111    111
222    333
333    555
444    777
555    999
666    222
777    444
888    666
999    888

I'm afraid the 3 and higher may not produce what you're looking for, since you didn't specify reading from the CURRENT (shifted) contents of the file, or from the ORIGINAL contents of the file. (did that make sense?)

As written, it REQUIRES a range to be supplied, either '%', or '<,'>, or line #'s.

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I have adapted ideas from your submission into an answer I attempted –  Kevin Lee Jul 11 '12 at 15:09
    
Glad to help. Anytime. –  lornix Jul 11 '12 at 18:59
function! Destripe(stripe) range

let s:rowbeg=getpos("'<")[1]           
let s:rowend=getpos("'>")[1]           
let s:curSetLngth=s:rowend-s:rowbeg+1

let stripe=a:stripe
let s:rowend += 1            

while stripe >= 2

  let stripeMin1 = stripe - 1                 

  " clear register
  let @e=''                                   

  " delete last stripe and append
  " to the e register
  execute "let @a='".stripeMin1."j\"Edd'"     

  " count how many times to perform a-macro
  let s:stripesInSlctn = s:curSetLngth / stripe           

  "silent ":'<" 
  let s:count=0
  while s:count <= s:stripesInSlctn
    norm @a 
    let s:count = s:count + 1
    "dbg echo s:count s:stripesInSlctn s:curSetLngth stripe s:rowbeg s:rowend
  endwhile

  let s:curSetLngth -= s:stripesInSlctn + 1

  " rowend location
  let s:rowend -= s:count      
  execute s:rowend

  " e-register collected the stripes
  " so place at bottom of selection
  norm "ep
  execute s:rowbeg
  let stripe -= 1
  let s:stripesInSlctn -= 1
endwhile

endfunction

If there is a way to clean this up let me know; for example, it only works in visual line selection because of how I set the script up.

To call from command line, make a visual line selection and then

:'<,'> call Destripe(n)

where n is the number of stripes.

The script effective does the following BEFORE (LHS) & AFTER (RHS):

aaa        aaa
bbb        aaa
ccc        aaa
aaa
bbb        bbb
ccc        bbb
aaa        bbb
bbb 
ccc        ccc
           ccc
           ccc

A potential issue with solution is that the blank spaces in between the destriped results are always there. Would anybody know how to debug that one out? For the most part this gets the job done. Thanks to @lornix for some inspiration (I didn't even know how to write a script in vim!, also I didn't know how a range could be fed into a function). SO community if you have any input on how I can improve it I would appreciate it greatly.

Another issue that factored in is the fact that the norm command could simply not be used because it works on an 'each line' basis, not on an nth line basis! So basically I was wishing for a way for norm to operate on per nth line (useful in multiplication scenarios like I have here, or cases where you are interested in every 3rd line, every 4th line, etc.) Perhaps there is a feature of norm I am just not using?

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