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I am starting to use MVC4 Web API project, I have controller with multiple HttpPost methods. The Controller looks like the following:

Controller

public class VTRoutingController : ApiController
{
    [HttpPost]
    public MyResult Route(MyRequestTemplate routingRequestTemplate)
    {
        return null;
    }

    [HttpPost]
    public MyResult TSPRoute(MyRequestTemplate routingRequestTemplate)
    {
        return null;
    }
}

Here MyRequestTemplate represents the template class responsible for handling the Json coming through the request.

Error:

When I make a request using Fiddler for http://localhost:52370/api/VTRouting/TSPRoute or http://localhost:52370/api/VTRouting/Route I get an error:

Multiple actions were found that match the request

If I remove one of the above method it works fine.

Global.asax

I have tried modifying the default routing table in global.asax, but I am still getting the error, I think I have problem in defining routes in global.asax. Here is what I am doing in global.asax.

public static void RegisterRoutes(RouteCollection routes)
{
    routes.MapHttpRoute(
            name: "MyTSPRoute",
            routeTemplate: "api/VTRouting/TSPRoute",
            defaults: new { }
      );

    routes.MapHttpRoute(
        name: "MyRoute",
        routeTemplate: "api/VTRouting/Route",
        defaults: new {action="Route" }
    );
}

I am making the request in Fiddler using POST, passing json in RequestBody for MyRequestTemplate.

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4 Answers

up vote 57 down vote accepted

You can have multiple actions in a single controller.

For that you have to do the following two things.

  • First decorate actions with ActionName attribute like [ActionName("route")]
public class VTRoutingController : ApiController
{
  [ActionName("route")]
  public MyResult PostRoute(MyRequestTemplate routingRequestTemplate)
  {
     return null;
  }

  [ActionName("tspRoute")]
  public MyResult PostTSPRoute(MyRequestTemplate routingRequestTemplate)
  {
     return null;
  }
}
  • Second define the following routes in WebApiConfig file.
// Controller Only
// To handle routes like `/api/VTRouting`
config.Routes.MapHttpRoute(
    name: "ControllerOnly",
    routeTemplate: "api/{controller}"             
);

// Controller with ID
// To handle routes like `/api/VTRouting/1`
config.Routes.MapHttpRoute(
    name: "ControllerAndId",
    routeTemplate: "api/{controller}/{id}",
    defaults: null,
    constraints: new { id = @"^\d+$" } // Only integers 
);

// Controllers with Actions
// To handle routes like `/api/VTRouting/route`
config.Routes.MapHttpRoute(
    name: "ControllerAndAction",
    routeTemplate: "api/{controller}/{action}"
);
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works fine..... –  yogee Oct 3 '12 at 20:32
    
What if I don't want to set any restriction on the type of the ID? Meaning: how can I accepts string IDs as well? –  frapontillo Sep 12 '13 at 7:54
3  
@frapontillo: The Id should be an integeter, so that it is distiguished from the route name otherwise the routing enghine will treat it as an action name rather then an id. If you need to have the id as string then you can create an action. –  Asif Mushtaq Sep 13 '13 at 11:42
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use:

routes.MapHttpRoute(
    name: "DefaultApi",
    routeTemplate: "api/{controller}/{action}/{id}",
    defaults: new { id = RouteParameter.Optional }
);

it's not a RESTful approach anymore, but you can now call your actions by name (rather than let the Web API automatically determine one for you based on the verb) like this:

[POST] /api/VTRouting/TSPRoute

[POST] /api/VTRouting/Route

Contrary to popular belief, there is nothing wrong with this approach, and it's not abusing Web API. You can still leverage on all the awesome features of Web API (delegating handlers, content negotiation, mediatypeformatters and so on) - you just ditch the RESTful approach.

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Thanks for the answer, but it is still giving me the same error. –  Habib Jul 10 '12 at 7:11
    
That's not possible, then something else must be misconfigured in your app. Can you show the entire Route setup? Also how exactly are you calling the controllers actions? –  Filip W Jul 10 '12 at 7:22
1  
did that, doesn't work –  Habib Jul 10 '12 at 7:39
1  
That's not possible. I created a sample project for you that does just what you want. Have a look dl.dropbox.com/u/23961623/MvcApplication33.zip. Just run in and there are two buttons on the home page. –  Filip W Jul 10 '12 at 7:57
1  
I will give it a shot, thanks for your time and effort –  Habib Jul 10 '12 at 9:48
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A web api endpoint (controller) is a single resource that accepts get/post/put/delete verbs. It is not a normal MVC controller.

Necessarily, at /api/VTRouting there can only be one HttpPost method that accepts the parameters you are sending. The function name does not matter, as long as you are decorating with the [http] stuff. I've never tried, though.

Edit: This does not work. In resolving, it seems to go by the number of parameters, not trying to model-bind to the type.

You can overload the functions to accept different parameters. I am pretty sure you would be OK if you declared it the way you do, but used different (incompatible) parameters to the methods. If the params are the same, you are out of luck as model binding won't know which one you meant.

[HttpPost]
public MyResult Route(MyRequestTemplate routingRequestTemplate) {...}

[HttpPost]
public MyResult TSPRoute(MyOtherTemplate routingRequestTemplate) {...}

This part works

The default template they give when you create a new one makes this pretty explicit, and I would say you should stick with this convention:

public class ValuesController : ApiController
{
    // GET is overloaded here.  one method takes a param, the other not.
    // GET api/values  
    public IEnumerable<string> Get() { .. return new string[] ... }
    // GET api/values/5
    public string Get(int id) { return "hi there"; }

    // POST api/values (OVERLOADED)
    public void Post(string value) { ... }
    public void Post(string value, string anotherValue) { ... }
    // PUT api/values/5
    public void Put(int id, string value) {}
    // DELETE api/values/5
    public void Delete(int id) {}
}

If you want to make one class that does many things, for ajax use, there is no big reason to not use a standard controller/action pattern. The only real difference is your method signatures aren't as pretty, and you have to wrap things in Json( returnValue) before you return them.

Edit:

Overloading works just fine when using the standard template (edited to include) when using simple types. I've gone and tested the other way too, with 2 custom objects with different signatures. Never could get it to work.

  • Binding with complex objects doesn't look "deep", so thats a no-go
  • You could get around this by passing an extra param, on the query string
  • A better writeup than I can give on available options

This worked for me in this case, see where it gets you. Exception for testing only.

public class NerdyController : ApiController
{
    public void Post(string type, Obj o) { 
        throw new Exception("Type=" + type + ", o.Name=" + o.Name ); 
    }
}

public class Obj {
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string Age { get; set; }
}

And called like this form the console:

$.post("/api/Nerdy?type=white", { 'Name':'Slim', 'Age':'21' } )
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I have tried changing the parameter types, but it seems it only allows a single Post method in the controller. Thanks for your reply –  Habib Jul 10 '12 at 7:35
    
I assumed that it would try model binding to find it, since you can overload. It works with different #'s of params, though. It might not be that hard to re-write it to do this though, but they haven't released the source code yet, so I'm just stuck looking at ugly disassembly –  Andrew Backer Jul 11 '12 at 1:34
1  
+1 for actually explaining the reason it's not working, and the philosophy behind web api. –  MEMark Jun 4 at 20:36
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public class Journal : ApiController
{
    public MyResult Get(journal id)
    {
        return null;
    }
}

public class Journal : ApiController
{

    public MyResult Get(journal id, publication id)
    {
        return null;
    }
}

I am not sure whether overloading get/post method violates the concept of restfull api,but it workds. If anyone could've enlighten on this matter. What if I have a uri as

uri:/api/journal/journalid
uri:/api/journal/journalid/publicationid

so as you might seen my journal sort of aggregateroot, though i can define another controller for publication solely and pass id number of publication in my url however this gives much more sense. since my publication would not exist without journal itself.

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