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I'm developing an Android 2.3.3 application with a service. I have this inside that service to communicate with Main activity:

public class UDPListenerService extends Service
{
    private static final String TAG = "UDPListenerService";
    //private ThreadGroup myThreads = new ThreadGroup("UDPListenerServiceWorker");
    private UDPListenerThread myThread;
    /**
     * Handler to communicate from WorkerThread to service.
     */
    private Handler mServiceHandler;

    // Used to receive messages from the Activity
    final Messenger inMessenger = new Messenger(new IncomingHandler());
    // Use to send message to the Activity
    private Messenger outMessenger;

    class IncomingHandler extends Handler
    {
        @Override
        public void handleMessage(Message msg)
        {
        }
    }

    /**
     * Target we publish for clients to send messages to Incoming Handler.
     */
    final Messenger mMessenger = new Messenger(new IncomingHandler());
    [ ... ]
}

And here, final Messenger mMessenger = new Messenger(new IncomingHandler());, I get the following Lint warning:

This Handler class should be static or leaks might occur: IncomingHandler

What does it mean?

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12  
Check out this blog post for a lot more information on this subject! –  Adrian Monk Jan 18 '13 at 18:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 205 down vote accepted

If IncomingHandler class is not static, it will have a reference to your Service object.

Handler objects for the same thread all share a common Looper object, which they post messages to and read from.

As messages contain target Handler, as long as there are messages with target handler in the message queue, the handler cannot be garbage collected. If handler is not static, your Service or Activity cannot be garbage collected, even after being destroyed.

This may lead to memory leaks, for some time at least - as long as the messages stay int the queue. This is not much of an issue unless you post long delayed messages.

You can make IncomingHandler static and have a WeakReference to your service:

static class IncomingHandler extends Handler {
    private final WeakReference<UDPListenerService> mService; 

    IncomingHandler(UDPListenerService service) {
        mService = new WeakReference<UDPListenerService>(service);
    }
    @Override
    public void handleMessage(Message msg)
    {
         UDPListenerService service = mService.get();
         if (service != null) {
              service.handleMessage(msg);
         }
    }
}

See this post by Romain Guy for further reference

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2  
Romain shows that the WeakReference to the outer class is all that's needed - a static nested class is not necessary. I think I'll prefer the WeakReference approach because otherwise the whole outer class drastically changes due to all the 'static' variables I'd need. –  Someone Somewhere Jul 18 '12 at 19:07
15  
If you want to use a nested class, it has to be static. Otherwise, WeakReference doesn't change anything. Inner (nested but not static) class always holds strong reference to outer class. There is no need for any static variables though. –  Tomasz Niedabylski Jul 18 '12 at 21:24
1  
@SomeoneSomewhere mSerivce is a WeakReference. get() will return null when referenced object was gc-ed. In this case, when service is dead. –  Tomasz Niedabylski Jul 23 '12 at 23:02
2  
You have to extend it –  Tomasz Niedabylski Oct 5 '12 at 11:41
1  
Note: after making the IncomingHandler static, I was getting the error "The constructor MyActivity.IncomingHandler() is undefined." on the line "final Messenger inMessenger = new Messenger(new IncomingHandler());". The solution is to change that line to "final Messenger inMessenger = new Messenger(new IncomingHandler(this));". –  Lance Lefebure Feb 5 '13 at 3:18

As others have mentioned the Lint warning is because of the potential memory leak. You can avoid the Lint warning by passing a Handler.Callback when constructing Handler (i.e. you don't subclass Handler and there is no Handler non-static inner class):

Handler mIncomingHandler = new Handler(new Handler.Callback() {
    @Override
    public boolean handleMessage(Message msg) {
    }
});

As I understand it, this will not avoid the potential memory leak. Message objects hold a reference to the mIncomingHandler object which holds a reference the Handler.Callback object which holds a reference to the Service object. As long as there are messages in the Looper message queue, the Service will not be GC. However, it won't be a serious issue unless you have long delay messages in the message queue.

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perfect solution! –  Braj May 7 at 11:17

This way worked well for me, keeps code clean by keeping where you handle the message in its own inner class.

The handler you wish to use

Handler mIncomingHandler = new Handler(new IncomingHandlerCallback());

The inner class

class IncomingHandlerCallback implements Handler.Callback{

    @Override
    public boolean handleMessage(Message message) {

        // Handle message code

        return true;
    }
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1  
In here handleMessage method returns true in the end. Could you please explain what exactly this means(the return value true/false)? Thanks. –  JibW Aug 15 '13 at 14:32
1  
My understanding of returning true is to indicate that you have handled the message and therefore the message should not be passed anywhere else e.g. the underlying handler. That said I couldn't find any documentation and would be happily corrected. –  Stuart Campbell Aug 22 '13 at 9:18
    
Javadoc says: Constructor associates this handler with the Looper for the current thread and takes a callback interface in which you can handle messages. If this thread does not have a looper, this handler won't be able to receive messages so an exception is thrown. <-- I think the new Handler(new IncomingHandlerCallback()) won't work when there is no Looper attached to the thread, and that CAN be the case. I am not saying its wrong to do so in some cases, I am just saying its not always working as you might expect. –  user504342 Oct 20 '13 at 13:07
    
@StuartCampbell: You are correct. See: groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/android-developers/L_xYM0yS6z8 . –  MDTech.us_MAN Apr 19 at 20:11

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