Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Why in Java you're able to add Strings with the + operator, when String is a class? In theString.java code I did not find any implementation for this operator. Does this concept violate object orientation?

share|improve this question
19  
Plus (+) operator is language feature of Java. –  AVD Jul 10 '12 at 7:24
16  
It's all compiler's magic. You can't do operator overloading in Java. –  Lion Jul 10 '12 at 7:42
11  
I think the weird thing is that String is implemented as a library outside the language (in java.lang.String), yet it has specific support inside the language. That ain't right. –  13ren Jul 11 '12 at 18:39
    

7 Answers 7

up vote 126 down vote accepted

Let's look at the following simple expressions in Java

int x=15;
String temp="x = "+x;

The compiler converts "x = "+x; into a StringBuilder internally and uses .append(int) to "add" the integer to the string.

5.1.11. String Conversion

Any type may be converted to type String by string conversion.

A value x of primitive type T is first converted to a reference value as if by giving it as an argument to an appropriate class instance creation expression (§15.9):

  • If T is boolean, then use new Boolean(x).
  • If T is char, then use new Character(x).
  • If T is byte, short, or int, then use new Integer(x).
  • If T is long, then use new Long(x).
  • If T is float, then use new Float(x).
  • If T is double, then use new Double(x).

This reference value is then converted to type String by string conversion.

Now only reference values need to be considered:

  • If the reference is null, it is converted to the string "null" (four ASCII characters n, u, l, l).
  • Otherwise, the conversion is performed as if by an invocation of the toString method of the referenced object with no arguments; but if the result of invoking the toString method is null, then the string "null" is used instead.

The toString method is defined by the primordial class Object (§4.3.2). Many classes override it, notably Boolean, Character, Integer, Long, Float, Double, and String.

See §5.4 for details of the string conversion context.

15.18.1.

Optimization of String Concatenation : An implementation may choose to perform conversion and concatenation in one step to avoid creating and then discarding an intermediate String object. To increase the performance of repeated string concatenation, a Java compiler may use the StringBuffer class or a similar technique to reduce the number of intermediate String objects that are created by evaluation of an expression.

For primitive types, an implementation may also optimize away the creation of a wrapper object by converting directly from a primitive type to a string.

The optimized version will not actually do a full wrapped String conversion first.

This is a good illustration of an optimized version used by the compiler, albeit without the conversion of a primitive, where you can see the compiler changing things into a StringBuilder in the background:

http://caprazzi.net/posts/java-bytecode-string-concatenation-and-stringbuilder/


This java code:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    String cip = "cip";
    String ciop = "ciop";
    String plus = cip + ciop;
    String build = new StringBuilder(cip).append(ciop).toString();
}

Generates this - see how the two concatenation styles lead to the very same bytecode:

 L0
    LINENUMBER 23 L0
    LDC "cip"
    ASTORE 1
   L1
    LINENUMBER 24 L1
    LDC "ciop"
    ASTORE 2

   // cip + ciop

   L2
    LINENUMBER 25 L2

    NEW java/lang/StringBuilder
    DUP
    ALOAD 1
    INVOKESTATIC java/lang/String.valueOf(Ljava/lang/Object;)Ljava/lang/String;
    INVOKESPECIAL java/lang/StringBuilder.<init>(Ljava/lang/String;)V
    ALOAD 2
    INVOKEVIRTUAL java/lang/StringBuilder.append(Ljava/lang/String;)Ljava/lang/StringBuilder;
    INVOKEVIRTUAL java/lang/StringBuilder.toString()Ljava/lang/String;

    ASTORE 3

    // new StringBuilder(cip).append(ciop).toString()

   L3
    LINENUMBER 26 L3

    NEW java/lang/StringBuilder
    DUP
    ALOAD 1
    INVOKESPECIAL java/lang/StringBuilder.<init>(Ljava/lang/String;)V
    ALOAD 2
    INVOKEVIRTUAL java/lang/StringBuilder.append(Ljava/lang/String;)Ljava/lang/StringBuilder;
    INVOKEVIRTUAL java/lang/StringBuilder.toString()Ljava/lang/String;

    ASTORE 4
   L4
    LINENUMBER 27 L4
    RETURN

Looking at the example above and how the byte code based on the source code in the given example is generated, you will be able to notice that the compiler has internally transformed the following statement

cip+ciop; 

into

new StringBuilder(cip).append(ciop).toString();

In other words, the operator + in string concatenation is effectively a shorthand for the more verbose StringBuilder idiom.

share|improve this answer
3  
Thanks a lot,I'm not familiar with jvm byte codes but generated code for String plus = cip + ciop; and String build = new StringBuilder(cip).append(ciop).toString(); are same. and my question is that is this operation violates object orientation? –  Пуя Jul 10 '12 at 7:45
7  
No, it doesn't. Operator overloading (as in C++ and some languages) has some drawbacks and Java designers felt that it's somewhat a confusing concept and omitted it from Java. To me, an object- oriented language must have the prime concepts of inheritance, Polymorphism and encapsulation that Java has. –  Lion Jul 10 '12 at 7:48
2  
yes, but I think that this operator has overloaded for String class –  Пуя Jul 10 '12 at 7:55
3  
Yes, operator overloading is used in Java for the concatenation of the String type however, you cannot define your own operator (as in C++, C# and some other languages). –  Lion Jul 10 '12 at 8:01
4  
@Pooya: actually "int / int" vs. "int / float" is already operator overloading, so even C has that. What C (and Java) however don't have is user-defined operator overloading: the only thing that defines the different ways an operator can be used (in both C and Java) is the language definition (and the distinction is implemented in the compiler). C++ differs in that it allows user-defined operator overloading (which is often referred to as simply "operator overloading"). –  Joachim Sauer Jul 10 '12 at 14:32

It is Java compiler feature which checks the operands of + operator. And based on the operands it generates the byte code:

  • For String, it generates code to concat strings
  • For Numbers, it generates code to add numbers.

This is what the Java spec says:

The operators + and - are called the additive operators. AdditiveExpression: MultiplicativeExpression AdditiveExpression + MultiplicativeExpression AdditiveExpression - MultiplicativeExpression

The additive operators have the same precedence and are syntactically left associative (they group left-to-right). If the type of either operand of a + operator is String, then the operation is string concatenation.

Otherwise, the type of each of the operands of the + operator must be a type that is convertible (§5.1.8)to a primitive numeric type, or a compile-time error occurs.

In every case, the type of each of the operands of the binary - operator must be a type that is convertible (§5.1.8) to a primitive numeric type, or a compile-time error occurs.

share|improve this answer
4  
The quote from the spec isn't relevant to this question at all. –  Ernest Friedman-Hill Jul 10 '12 at 13:27
    
This is the extract "If the type of either operand of a + operator is String, then the operation is string concatenation. Otherwise, the type of each of the operands of the + operator must be a type that is convertible (§5.1.8)to a primitive numeric type, or a compile-time error occurs". Can you please tell me why it is not relevant. –  Ramesh PVK Jul 10 '12 at 15:48
5  
It doesn't say anything about how it's implemented, which is the question. I think the poster already understand that the feature exists. –  Ernest Friedman-Hill Jul 10 '12 at 16:00

How String class overrides + operator?

It doesn't. The compiler does it. Strictly speaking, the compiler overloads the + operator for String operands.

share|improve this answer

First of all (+) is overloaded not overridden

The Java language provides special support for the string concatenation operator (+), which has been overloaded for Java Strings objects.

  1. If left hand side operand is String it works as concatenation.

  2. If left hand side operand is Integer it works as addition operator

share|improve this answer
2  
(2) If the left operand is an Integer it is auto-unboxed to int and then the normal rules of Java apply. –  EJP Jul 10 '12 at 9:54
2  
The two rules given below the quote are wrong: I believe they should be: two primitives (or unboxable classes) = addition; at least one string = concatenation –  mwfearnley Apr 3 '13 at 3:24

The + operator is usually replaced by a StringBuilder at compile time. Check this answer for more details on that matter.

share|improve this answer
    
If this is the case, is there any reason why StringBuilder exists at all for public use ? Are there any cases where + operator is not replaced by StringBuilder ? –  Cemre Apr 10 '13 at 16:38
1  
The question you want to ask is "why does the + operator exist at all for public use?", because thats the abomination here. As for your other question, I do not know it exactly, but I'd guess there is no such case. –  Scorpio Apr 12 '13 at 5:51

The Java language provides special support for the string concatenation operator (+) and for conversion of other objects to strings. String concatenation is implemented through the StringBuilder(or StringBuffer) class and its append method.

share|improve this answer
    
docjar.com/html/api/java/lang/String.java.html for documentation. –  Jigar Pandya Jul 10 '12 at 7:27

The meaning of the + operator when applied to String is defined by the language, as everyone has written already. Since you don't seem to find this sufficiently convincing, consider this:

Ints, floats and doubles all have different binary representations, and therefore adding two ints is a different operation, in terms of bit manipulation, than adding two floats: For ints you can add bit by bit, carrying a bit and checking for overflow; for floats you must deal with the mantissas and exponents separately.

So, in principle, "addition" depends on the nature of the objects being "added". Java defines it for Strings as well as ints and floats (longs, doubles, ...)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.