Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Below is an example I got from someone's blog about python closure. I run it in python 2.7 and get a output different from my expect.

flist = []

for i in xrange(3):
    def func(x):
        return x*i
    flist.append(func)

for f in flist:
    print f(2)

My expected output is: 0, 2, 4
But the output is: 4, 4, 4
Is there anyone could help to explain it?
Thank you in advance.

share|improve this question
3  
possible duplicate of Lexical closures in Python –  BrenBarn Jul 10 '12 at 7:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Loops do not introduce scope in Python, so all three functions close over the same i variable, and will refer to its final value after the loop finishes, which is 2.

It seems as though nearly everyone I talk to who uses closures in Python has been bitten by this. The corollary is that the outer function can change i but the inner function cannot (since that would make i a local instead of a closure based on Python's syntactic rules).

There are two ways to address this:

# avoid closures and use default args which copy on function definition
for i in xrange(3):
    def func(x, i=i):
        return x*i
    flist.append(func)

# or introduce an extra scope to close the value you want to keep around:
for i in xrange(3):
    def makefunc(i):
        def func(x):
            return x*i
        return func
    flist.append(makefunc(i))

# the second can be simplified to use a single makefunc():
def makefunc(i):
    def func(x):
        return x*i
    return func
for i in xrange(3):
    flist.append(makefunc(i))

# if your inner function is simple enough, lambda works as well for either option:
for i in xrange(3):
    flist.append(lambda x, i=i: x*i)

def makefunc(i):
    return lambda x: x*i
for i in xrange(3):
    flist.append(makefunc(i))
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Great explanation and solution. –  jamylak Jul 10 '12 at 7:39
    
Note for other readers: Python 3 adds the nonlocal keyword, which would allow each func to change the value of i, which in turn would affect the others. Not useful in this case, but potentially handy if you had several inner functions. –  Walter Mundt Jul 10 '12 at 9:34
    
You could simplify the last one a bit more with lambda, though that restricts what func() can do. –  Dubslow Jul 10 '12 at 9:36
    
@Dubslow I don't think that would simplify it. def looks a lot nicer imo –  jamylak Jul 10 '12 at 11:49
    
Added the lambda-based options, since they do make sense sometimes for small things. It's true that I rarely end up needing them these days; in 2.7 generator/dict/set comprehensions have eaten up a lot of their usefulness. –  Walter Mundt Jul 10 '12 at 18:14

You are not creating closures. You are generating a list of functions which each access the global variable i which is equal to 2 after the first loop. Thus you end up with 2 * 2 for each function call.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the answer. If I want to create closure to get my expected output, how to change the code? Could you please give me some suggestion? –  Alex.Zhang Jul 10 '12 at 7:34
    
@Alex.Zhang: Well, you did ask for an explanation for why the behaviour experienced is not the same as you expected. See stackoverflow.com/a/11408601/21945 for a solution. –  mhawke Jul 10 '12 at 7:38

Each function accesses the global i.

functools.partial comes to rescue:

from functools import partial
flist = []

for i in xrange(3):
    def func(x, multiplier=None):
        return x * multiplier
    flist.append(partial(func, multiplier=i))
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.