Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am a generics newbie and I am not able to find out the best way to achieve this. Please feel free to point out if I am doing something obviously wrong.

interface Node<T> {

    void addOne(Node<T> node);
}

class StringNode implements Node<String> {

    List<StringNode> data = new ArrayList<>();

    /**
     * {@inheritDoc}
     */
    @Override
    public void addOne(Node<String> node) {
        StringNode stringNode = (StringNode) node;
        data.add(stringNode);
    }

}

I was hoping to find a way to avoid the downcast from Node to StringNode in the implementation of addOne by having the function itself be of signature public void addOne(StringNode node). Any ideas as to how the definition of Node can be changed to achieve this for any implementation of the interface?

I tried searching through the questions already asked, but was not able to find a close match. Any pointers to questions where this has already been discussed would also be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is how I would have done it:

interface Node<T extends Node<T>> {

    void addOne(T node);
}

class StringNode implements Node<StringNode> {

    List<StringNode> data = new ArrayList<StringNode>();

    /**
     * {@inheritDoc}
     */
    @Override
    public void addOne(StringNode node) {
        data.add(node);
    }

}

Similar to U-No-Poo's suggestion, but a little more strict (forces T to actually be a node)

share|improve this answer
    
"but a little more strict" yeah but why be strict when not necessary? –  newacct Jul 10 '12 at 17:36
    
Of it depends on how it's going to be used, but in this case it matches the example in the question better. –  Gustav Karlsson Jul 12 '12 at 7:51

Why are you using String and StringNode separatly? Couldn't you just say

interface Node<T> {

    void addOne(T node);
}

class StringNode implements Node<StringNode> {

    List<StringNode> data = new ArrayList<StringNode>();

    /**
     * {@inheritDoc}
     */
    @Override
    public void addOne(StringNode node) {
        StringNode stringNode =  node;
        data.add(stringNode);
    }

}
share|improve this answer

You could introduce another generic parameter:

public interface Node<VALUE_TYPE, SELF> {
  public void addOne(SELF u);
}

public class StringNode implements Node<String, StringNode> {

  @Override
  public void addOne(StringNode u) {
    // TODO Auto-generated method stub  
  }
}

Use VALUE_TYPE whenever you need the actual value type (in this case String) and SELF whenever you want to pass a node of that type.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.