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I have a few singleton classes with some extra functions which are run in separate thread. The structure looks like:

class Singleton
{
   private:
      boost::mutex mMutex;
      std::vector<std::string> mMessages;

   public:
      void AddMessage(const std::string &msg)
      {
         mMutex.lock();
         mMessages.push_back(msg);
         mMutex.unlock();
      }

      void Sender()
      {
          while (true) {
             mMutex.lock();
             for (size_t i = 0; i < mMessages.size(); ++i)
             {
                 // Do something with mMessages[i]
             }
             mMutex.unlock();
          }
      }
};

...

int main()
{
   Singleton *handle;
   handle = Singleton::instance();
   boost::thread sender(boost::bind(&Singleton::Sender, handle));

   ... app cycle ...
}

Sometimes it fails with error:

terminate called after throwing an instance of

'boost::exception_detail::clone_impl<boost::exception_detail::error_info_injector<boost::lock_error> >'
  what():  boost::lock_error
Aborted

What could it be and what's the best why to find out the reason of assert?

share|improve this question
2  
as a side note, you should use locks like boost::scoped_lock instead of just locking mutexes –  Nikko Jul 10 '12 at 8:20
1  
your Sender() function is spinning without doing anything if mMessages is empty. You should use a condition variable here to let the thread block until there is something to do. –  Torsten Robitzki Jul 10 '12 at 8:23
    
@TorstenRobitzki yeah, there is sleeping of the thread. I just decided not to show this in example –  Ockonal Jul 10 '12 at 8:24
    
Do as Nikko says, or else if your code throws an exception you will be in big trouble! –  rodrigo Jul 10 '12 at 8:46

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

May be that you did not create the object Singleton! So the mutex is not created either.

Try:

int main()
{
   Singleton handle; //object, not pointer
   boost::thread sender(boost::bind(&Singleton::Sender, &handle));
   ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
Oh, sorry. No, after creating handle I initialize it. –  Ockonal Jul 10 '12 at 8:21

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