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I have a custom model binder which is invoked for a particular parameter going into an action method:

public override ActionResult MyAction(int someData, [ModelBinder(typeof(MyCustomModelBinder))]List<MyObject> myList ... )

This works well - the binder is called as expected. However, I want to invoke the default model binder for some addtional values that are in the Request.Form collection. The form keys are named like this:

dataFromView[0].Key
dataFromView[0].Value
dataFromView[1].Key
dataFromView[1].Value

The default model binder nicely converts these values into an IDictionary if I add an IDictionary as a parameter on the action method.

However, I want to manipulate these values at the model binder level (along with the original List object above).

Is there a way to get the default model binder to create this dictionary from the form values for my in the BindModel() method of my custom model binder?

public override object BindModel(ControllerContext controllerContext, ModelBindingContext bindingContext)
{
    //Get the default model binder to provide the IDictionary from the form values...           
}

I've tried to using the bindingContext.ValueProvider.GetValue but it always seems to return null when I'm trying to cast to an IDictionary.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here's a potential solution I found (by looking at the default model binder source code) which allows you to use the default model binders functionality for creating a Dictionary, List etc.

Create a new ModelBindingContext detailing the binding values you require:

var dictionaryBindingContext = new ModelBindingContext()
            {
                ModelMetadata = ModelMetadataProviders.Current.GetMetadataForType(() => null, typeof(IDictionary<long, int>)),
                ModelName = "dataFromView", //The name(s) of the form elements you want going into the dictionary
                ModelState = bindingContext.ModelState,
                PropertyFilter = bindingContext.PropertyFilter,
                ValueProvider = bindingContext.ValueProvider
            };

var boundValues = base.BindModel(controllerContext, dictionaryBindingContext);

Now the default model binder is invoked with the binding context you have specified and will return the bound object as normal.

Seems to work so far...

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If your model binder needs to work with some other form data this means that you haven't positioned this model binder on the correct type. The correct type for your model binder would be the following:

public class MyViewModel
{
    public IDictionary<string, string> DataFromView { get; set; }
    public List<MyObject> MyList { get; set; }
}

and then:

public class MyCustomModelBinder : DefaultModelBinder
{
    public override object BindModel(ControllerContext controllerContext, ModelBindingContext bindingContext)
    {
        var model = base.BindModel(controllerContext, bindingContext);

        // do something with the model

        return model;
    }
}

and then:

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Index([ModelBinder(typeof(MyCustomModelBinder))] MyViewModel model)
{
    ...
}

This assumes the following data is posted:

dataFromView[0].Key
dataFromView[0].Value
dataFromView[1].Value
dataFromView[1].Key
myList[0].Text
myList[1].Text
myList[2].Text
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Thanks for this Darin - just to ask, there's no other way to do this rather than encapsulating these parameters in a view model? I'm working with some existing code where the action methods in question take individual parameters rather than a view model object. –  harman_kardon Jul 10 '12 at 9:04
    
@MattW, you could always directly read and parse the request parameters but it will be a lot of work and unfortunately you cannot benefit from what the model binder already does with dictionaries. But if you are working with some existing code that doesn't use view models, this existing code should be fixed and view models introduced. –  Darin Dimitrov Jul 10 '12 at 10:01
    
totally agree (and I'll be pushing for the use of a view model). Interestingly, I've found a solution of sorts (below). Would be interested to know if you see any problems with this approach (aside from the fact it is a little hacky!) –  harman_kardon Jul 10 '12 at 10:14
    
No, it's fine, the only potential issue I see with this approach is that your model binder no longer depends only on the class it is designed for. It's more of a design problem, not technical. Your solution will work. –  Darin Dimitrov Jul 10 '12 at 11:38
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