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I am getting a little confused between using objects as attributes within other objects (and invoking methods on the attribute) using composition, versus having a good overall coupling.

Is there a tradeoff here?

Perhaps its easier giving examples of bad coupling to explain the difference (if there is a difference)?

EDIT example:

public class MyClass(){
    MyOtherClass moc;

    public MyClass(MyOtherClass temp){
        moc = temp;
    }

    public void method(){
        moc.call()
    }
}

is this bad coupling because of the dependency on the composition relationship?? If not, what would be bad coupling in this example.

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What is "good overall coupling"? In general, almost any kind of coupling is undesirable. –  Marko Topolnik Jul 10 '12 at 8:40
    
Why don't you give some examples? –  Nick Jul 10 '12 at 8:46
    
Edited with example –  mezamorphic Jul 10 '12 at 9:14
    
Ugh. Don't call the parameter to the constructor "temp". That's a horrible name that should almost never be used for anything. Better to call it "moc" and do this.moc = moc; or call it "otherOne" and do moc = otherOne; or anything other than "temp", really. –  David Conrad Jul 11 '12 at 7:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Two fundamental ways to relate classes are inheritance and composition.When you establish an inheritance relationship between two classes, you get to take advantage of dynamic binding and polymorphism.

Given that the inheritance relationship makes it hard to change the interface of a superclass, it is worth looking at an alternative approach provided by composition. It turns out that when your goal is code reuse, composition provides an approach that yields easier-to-change code.

class Fruit {

// Return int number of pieces of peel that
// resulted from the peeling activity.
public int peel() {

    System.out.println("Peeling is appealing.");
    return 1;
}
}

class Apple extends Fruit {
}

class Example1 {

public static void main(String[] args) {

    Apple apple = new Apple();
    int pieces = apple.peel();
}
}

If at some point in the future, however, you wish to change the return value of peel() to type Peel, you will break the code for Example1 code even though Example1 uses Apple directly and never explicitly mentions Fruit.

Composition provides an alternative way for Apple to reuse Fruit's implementation of peel(). Instead of extending Fruit, Apple can hold a reference to a Fruit instance and define its own peel() method that simply invokes peel() on the Fruit. Here's the code:

class Fruit {

// Return int number of pieces of peel that
// resulted from the peeling activity.
public int peel() {

    System.out.println("Peeling is appealing.");
    return 1;
}
 }

class Apple {

private Fruit fruit = new Fruit();

public int peel() {
    return fruit.peel();
}
}

class Example2 {

public static void main(String[] args) {

    Apple apple = new Apple();
    int pieces = apple.peel();
}
}

Inheritance gives you higher coupling than Composition.

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I looked at that example a few eyars ago and I understand the dangers of inheritance "propagating" errors through. So is it ok to use composition and this technique is not bad coupling? –  mezamorphic Jul 10 '12 at 9:15
    
@Porcupine it depends on your requirement if two objects are really coupled then you can not avoid it but yes Composition is preferred over Inheritance. –  amicngh Jul 10 '12 at 9:29
    
So normal coupling is not an "evil" its just one of those things purists hate? –  mezamorphic Jul 10 '12 at 9:48

Instead of bad/good coupling, it seems like the most accepted terms are tight/loose coupling, with loosely coupled objects being preferred. In your example, tighter coupling could be something like this (with added functionality for illustration):

public class MyClass()
{
    MyOtherClass moc;
    public MyClass(MyOtherClass temp)
    {
        moc = temp;
    }

    public void method()
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < moc.items.Count; i++)
        {
            moc.items[i].Price += 5;
        }
    }
}

Here, MyClass depends on specific implementation details of MyOtherClass (the implementation of the list of items, the cost, etc...). A more loosely coupled way to handle this type of scenario would be to move that logic into a function on MyOtherClass. That way all of the implementation details of MyOtherClass are hidden from MyClass, and can change independently of MyClass.

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