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I have read in many places about references:

Reference is like a const pointer

Reference always refer to an object

Once initialised, a Reference cannot be reseated

I want to make myself clear on the last point. What does that mean?

I tried this code:

#include <iostream>
int main()
{
    int x = 5;
    int y = 8;

    int &rx = x;
    std::cout<<rx<<"\n";

    rx = y;    //Changing the reference rx to become alias of y
    std::cout<<rx<<"\n";
}

Output

5  
8

Then what does it mean by "References cannot be reseated"?

share|improve this question
    
Do not take seriously assertion that says Reference is like a const pointer. It is wrong. Then in main() do std::cout<<x<<"\n"; and you will get 8. –  Keynslug Jul 10 '12 at 8:51
    
Reference is like a constant pointer. It is not like a pointer to constant. See article here for the details. –  Alex Wilson Jul 10 '12 at 8:55
1  
@AlexWilson I prefer to not confuse cppcoder to think that references are somehow like constant pointers. Generally it is ok to say "reference behaves like constant pointer in terms of access to referenced object". But they are different entities in many ways. –  Keynslug Jul 10 '12 at 9:10
3  
@AlexWilson: In general, it does not matter what a compiler of your acquaintance does or what you think it does, your statement (as well as below answer) is still wrong. One easy example why your assumption is wrong is temporary object lifetime extension. This won't happen with a const pointer, ever. If references decayed to pointers, your compiler would consequently be unable to comply with a guarantee given by the standard. –  Damon Jul 10 '12 at 9:32
1  
@Damon. Now that is a good point. My apologies to all. I will update as appropriate. –  Alex Wilson Jul 10 '12 at 9:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

This line:

rx = y;

Does not make rx point to y. It makes the value of x (via the reference) become the value of y. See:

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    int x = 5;
    int y = 8;

    int &rx = x;
    std::cout << rx <<"\n";

    // Updating the variable referenced by rx (x) to equal y
    rx = y;    
    std::cout << rx <<"\n";
    std::cout << x << "\n";
    std::cout << y << "\n";
}

Thus it is not possible to change what rx refers to after its initial assignment, but you can change the value of the thing being referenced.

A reference is therefore similar to a constant pointer (where the pointer address is the constant, not the value at that address) for the purposes of this example. However there are important differences, one good example (as pointed out by Damon) being that you can assign temporaries to local const references and the compiler will extend their lifetime to persist for the lifetime of the reference.

Considerable further detail on the differences between references and const pointers can be found in the answers to this SO post.

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1  
So, by the statement, "References cannot be reseated", it means the address does not change, but the value can change. –  cppcoder Jul 10 '12 at 8:55
    
Yes. It does mean that. So in this article (which I also mentioned in a comment on your question) it is like a constant pointer. –  Alex Wilson Jul 10 '12 at 8:56

You changed the value of x to the value of y :-)

share|improve this answer

int &rx = x; makes rx an alias to x.

Then, rx = y implies x = y

After an alias is made, any use of it (rx) will be equivalent to use of x. This you cannot undo (reseat rx) to make rx an alias of say 'y'.

share|improve this answer
    
rx is an alias of y right after the second assignment? Because rx holds the same value as y. –  cppcoder Jul 10 '12 at 8:58
3  
no: an alias of means refers to the storage location of, not has the same value as –  Useless Jul 10 '12 at 9:04
    
@Useless - That explains it. –  cppcoder Jul 10 '12 at 9:08
    
This answer is exactly right. That's just what a reference is, an alias. –  Damon Jul 10 '12 at 9:36

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