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Actually this was a homework I got. But I do not know the answer. Can anyone please help me?

What is the important memory allocation flaw that is seen in the following C++ code? How can you avoid it?

void testFunction(){
   int * p = new int(5);
   cout << p << *p << &p << endl;
}
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closed as not a real question by casperOne Jul 10 '12 at 15:53

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4  
You clearly put no effort into this. If you took 10 seconds to type in "C++ new" into google you would of immediately found advice about having one delete for every corresponding new and one delete[] for every corresponding new[] and not mixing them. Missing homework tag. Homework requires you to put in some effort, not to simply repost the question. –  Preet Kukreti Jul 10 '12 at 9:02
    
@Preet No need to take "that 10 seconds". I know that every new needs a delete and every new[] neds a delete[]. But the thing here is I did not understand the question. Thanks to Luchian Grigore, I understood the question properly only after reading his answer. And about the 'homework' tag; as I recently joined here, I did not know that there is a 'homework' tag. Anyway thanks for the information –  Kadiam Jul 11 '12 at 7:10
    
I would presume that if you already "know" about new and delete, you would also have investigated what they actually do beyond syntax and have a basic idea of how they function (heap allocation), and hence how heap allocation differs from stack allocation/auto variables in usage and requirements. Might as well add here that in practical C++, you would almost never have a function like the one in the question (you would either use stack variable or pass a value in by reference or pointer if you need to modify it in the calling scope, or pass by value if you just want to print) –  Preet Kukreti Jul 12 '12 at 3:14

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The memory is never released, so you have a memory leak. You can fix this by deleting the pointer:

void testFunction(){
   int * p = new int(5);
   cout << p << *p << &p << endl;
   delete p;
}
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