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I have this situation that when AbstractMethod method is invoked from ImplementClass I want to enforce that MustBeCalled method in the AbstractClass is invoked. I’ve never come across this situation before. Thank you!

public abstract class AbstractClass
{
    public abstract void AbstractMethod();

    public void MustBeCalled()
    {
        //this must be called when AbstractMethod is invoked
    }
}

public class ImplementClass : AbstractClass
{
    public override void AbstractMethod()
    {
        //when called, base.MustBeCalled() must be called.
        //how can i enforce this?
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
How about when AbstractClass.AbstractMethod is invoked by child class an event is raised to invoke AbstractClass.MustBeCalled. But again still unsure how to do it. – Jeff Jul 17 '09 at 1:46
up vote 8 down vote accepted

An option would be to have the Abstract class do the calling in this manner. Otherwise, there is no way in c# to require an inherited class to implement a method in a certain way.

public abstract class AbstractClass
{
    public void PerformThisFunction()
    {
        MustBeCalled();
        AbstractMethod();
    }

    public void MustBeCalled()
    {
        //this must be called when AbstractMethod is invoked
    }

    //could also be public if desired
    protected abstract void AbstractMethod();
}

public class ImplementClass : AbstractClass
{
    protected override void AbstractMethod()
    {
        //when called, base.MustBeCalled() must be called.
        //how can i enforce this?
    }
}

Doing this creates the desired public facing method in the abstract class, giving the abstract class over how and in what order things are called, while still allowing the concrete class to provide needed functionality.

share|improve this answer
    
*** Thank you. *** – Jeff Jul 17 '09 at 1:55
    
I have used this pattern as well. I believe this is actually one of the Gang Of Four design patterns, but I don't have my book here to confirm that. – MedicineMan Jul 17 '09 at 1:56
    
How about raising event when Base.AbstractMethod() is called? – Jeff Jul 17 '09 at 1:58
    
I think it's called 'Template Pattern'. Also, I think Simon's solution is a better approach. In the above code, calling code may call AbstractMethod directly without going through PerformFunction method. – SolutionYogi Jul 17 '09 at 2:18

How about

public abstract class AbstractClass
{
    public void AbstractMethod()
    {
        MustBeCalled();
        InternalAbstractMethod();
    }

    protected abstract void InternalAbstractMethod();

    public void MustBeCalled()
    {
        //this must be called when AbstractMethod is invoked
    }
}

public class ImplementClass : AbstractClass
{
    protected override void InternalAbstractMethod()
    {
        //when called, base.MustBeCalled() must be called.
        //how can i enforce this?
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
In this implementation, I don't think you've forced the user to call MustBeCalled. When AbstractClass.AbstractMethod is called, ImplementClass.AbstractMethod is called, but MustBeCalled isn't. I believe yshuditelu has the better solution – MedicineMan Jul 17 '09 at 1:55

One thing the preceding solutions ignore is that ImplementClass can redefine MethodToBeCalled and not call MustBeCalled -

public abstract class AbstractClass
{
    public abstract void AbstractMethod();

    private void MustBeCalled()
    {
        //will be invoked by  MethodToBeCalled();
        Console.WriteLine("AbstractClass.MustBeCalled");
    }

    public void MethodToBeCalled()
    {
        MustBeCalled();
        AbstractMethod();
    }
}

public class ImplementClass : AbstractClass
{
    public override void AbstractMethod()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("ImplementClass.InternalAbstractMethod");
    }

    public new void MethodToBeCalled() {
        AbstractMethod();
    }
}

If only C# allowed non-overridden methods to be sealed - like Java's final keyword!

The only way I can think of to overcome this is to use delegation rather than inheritance, because classes can be defined as sealed. And I'm using a namespace and the "internal" access modifier to prevent providing a new implementation on implementing classes. Also, the method to override must be defined as protected, otherwise users could call it directly.

namespace Something
{

    public sealed class OuterClass
    {
        private AbstractInnerClass inner;

        public OuterClass(AbstractInnerClass inner)
        {
            this.inner = inner;
        }

        public void MethodToBeCalled()
        {
            MustBeCalled();
            inner.CalledByOuter();
        }

        public void MustBeCalled()
        {
            //this must be called when AbstractMethod is invoked
            System.Console.WriteLine("OuterClass.MustBeCalled");
        }
    }

    public abstract class AbstractInnerClass
    {
        internal void CalledByOuter()
        {
            AbstractMethod();
        }

        protected abstract void AbstractMethod();
    }
}

public class ImplementInnerClass : Something.AbstractInnerClass
{
    protected override void AbstractMethod()
    {
        //when called, base.MustBeCalled() must be called.
        //how can i enforce this?
        System.Console.WriteLine("ImplementInnerClass.AbstractMethod");
    }

    public new void CalledByOuter()
    {
        System.Console.WriteLine("doesn't work");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
The fact that a derived class may shadow MethodToBeCalled won't pose a problem for code that uses the derived-class object as a base-class one. I do think method hierarchies could be improved if "private overridable" methods were allowed; I don't know if there's any technical reason they couldn't be. A private overridable method could only be called from the base class, or from within a derived class' override of the same method. It would thus be impossible to call the code in the base implementation except from within a base-class call to the most-derived version. – supercat Feb 10 '11 at 21:18

Why can't you just call the method in the AbstractMethod() of Implement class?

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