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I'm getting out off the closet on this! I don't understand SBT. There, I said it, now help me please.

All roads lead to Rome, and that is the same for SBT: To get started with SBT there is SBT, SBT Launcher, SBT-extras, etc, and then there are different ways to include and decide on repositories. Is there a 'best' way?

I'm asking because sometimes I get a little lost. The SBT documentation is very thorough and complete, but I find myself not knowing when to use build.sbt or project/build.properties or project/Build.scala or project/plugins.sbt.

Then it becomes fun, there is the Scala-IDE and SBT - What is the correct way of using them together? What comes first, the chicken or the egg?

Most importantly is probably, how do you find the right repositories and versions to include in your project? Do I just pull out a machette and start hacking my way forward? I quite often find projects that include everything and the kitchen sink, and then I realize - I'm not the only one who gets a little lost.

As a simple example, right now, I'm starting a brand new project. I want to use the latest features of SLICK and Scala and this will probably require the latest version of SBT. What is the sane point to get started, and why? In what file should I define it and how should it look? I know I can get this working, but I would really like an expert opinion on where everything should go (why it should go there will be a bonus).

I've been using SBT for small projects for well over a year now. I used SBT and then SBT Extras (as it made some headaches magically disappear), but I'm not sure why I should be using the one or the other. I'm just getting a little frustrated for not understanding how things fit together (SBT and repositories), and think it will save the next guy coming this way a lot of hardship if this could be explained in human terms.

UPDATE:

For what it's worth, I created a blank SBT project directory for new guys to get going quicker: SBT-jumpstart

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What exactly do you mean with "there is the Scala-IDE and SBT"? You define your project with sbt and sbt can generate an ide (eclipse oder intellij) project. So SBT comes first... –  Jan Jul 10 '12 at 10:57
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@Jan I mentioned that because Scala-IDE uses SBT as build manager. See assembla.com/spaces/scala-ide/wiki/SBT-based_build_manager and lower down in the post they mention "There is not need to define your SBT project file." which I found confusing. –  JacobusR Jul 10 '12 at 11:04
    
ok. As i usually use intellij (or sublime) to edit scala I didn't know that. I guess the builder generates its own sbt configs? –  Jan Jul 10 '12 at 12:14
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@JacobusR The fact that the Scala IDE uses SBT to build your project's sources is an implementation detail, and users need not to worry about this. There are really 0 implications. Outside of Eclipse users can build a project with SBT, Maven, Ant, ..., and that won't make any difference for the Scala IDE. One more thing, even if you have a SBT project, the Scala IDE doesn't care, i.e., it doesn't look for your Build.scala to set up the classpath, and that's why you actually need sbteclipse to generate the Eclipse .classpath. Hope this helps. –  Mirco Dotta Jul 10 '12 at 18:43
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@Jan Scala IDE added to the confusion, and yes, documentation that gives a bigger picture on setting up a good Scala development environment and some solid guidance of suitable programming workflows would come in very handy. –  JacobusR Jul 11 '12 at 7:48
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2 Answers 2

up vote 19 down vote accepted

Most importantly is probably, how do you find the right repositories and versions to include in your project? Do I just pull out a machette and start hacking my way forward? I quite often find projects that include everything and the kitchen sink

For Scala-based dependencies, I would go with what the authors recommend. For instance: http://code.google.com/p/scalaz/#SBT indicates to use:

libraryDependencies += "org.scalaz" %% "scalaz-core" % "6.0.4"

Or https://github.com/typesafehub/sbteclipse/ has instructions on where to add:

addSbtPlugin("com.typesafe.sbteclipse" % "sbteclipse-plugin" % "2.1.0-RC1")

For Java-based dependencies, I use http://mvnrepository.com/ to see what's out there, then click on the SBT tab. For instance http://mvnrepository.com/artifact/net.sf.opencsv/opencsv/2.3 indicates to use:

libraryDependencies += "net.sf.opencsv" % "opencsv" % "2.3"

Then pull out the machette and start hacking your way forward. If you are lucky you don't end up using jars that depends on some of the same jars but with incompatible versions. Given the Java ecosystem, you often end up including everything and the kitchen sink and it takes some effort to eliminate dependencies or ensure you are not missing required dependencies.

As a simple example, right now, I'm starting a brand new project. I want to use the latest features of SLICK and Scala and this will probably require the latest version of SBT. What is the sane point to get started, and why?

I think the sane point is to build immunity to sbt gradually.

Make sure you understand:

  1. scopes format {<build-uri>}<project-id>/config:key(for task-key)
  2. the 3 flavors of settings (SettingKey, TaskKey, InputKey) - read the section called "Task Keys" in http://www.scala-sbt.org/release/docs/Getting-Started/Basic-Def

Keep those 4 pages open at all times so that you can jump and look up various definitions and examples:

  1. http://www.scala-sbt.org/release/docs/Getting-Started/Basic-Def
  2. http://www.scala-sbt.org/release/docs/Detailed-Topics/index
  3. http://harrah.github.com/xsbt/latest/sxr/Keys.scala.html
  4. http://harrah.github.com/xsbt/latest/sxr/Defaults.scala.html

Make maximum use of show and inspect and the tab completion to get familiar with actual values of settings, their dependencies, definitions and related settings. I don't believe the relationships you'll discover using inspect are documented anywhere. If there is a better way I want to know about it.

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The way I use sbt is:

  1. use sbt-extras - just get the shell script and add it to the root of you project
  2. Create a project folder with a MyProject.scala file for setting up sbt. I much prefer this over the build.sbt approach - its scala and is more flexible
  3. Create a project/plugins.sbt file and add the appropriate plugin for your IDE. Either sbt-eclipse, sbt-idea or ensime-sbt-cmd so that you can generate project files for eclipse, intellij or ensime.
  4. Launch sbt in the root of your project and generate the project files for your IDE
  5. Profit

I don't bother checking in the IDE project files since they are generated by sbt, but there may be reasons you want to do that.

You can see an example set up like this here.

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Thank you for the good answer. I accepted the other answer, because it covers more ground, and up-voted your's cause it's really good also. I would have accepted both if I could. –  JacobusR Jul 11 '12 at 11:58
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