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Whenever my broadcast is executed I want to show alert to foreground activity.

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from where you want to get context of Activity. Is this will be ur app activity or other application. – AANKIT Jul 10 '12 at 10:34
    
this is an app activity. I have done alert dialog coding on broadcastreceiver onreceive() function. – Deepali Jul 10 '12 at 10:37
    
an app activity! is this your app?? and why do you want this, any reason, may there are alternative for the same – AANKIT Jul 10 '12 at 10:40
    
I want to show alert on my foreground activity.Is their any other way to show alert to foreground activity without context. – Deepali Jul 10 '12 at 10:53
    
in onreceive only u get COntext as a param, you can say context.getApplicationContext() – AANKIT Jul 10 '12 at 10:55

(Note: An official API was added in API 14: See this answer http://stackoverflow.com/a/29786451/119733)

DO NOT USE PREVIOUS (waqas716) answer.

You will have memory leak problem, because of the static reference to the activity. For more detail see the following link http://android-developers.blogspot.fr/2009/01/avoiding-memory-leaks.html

To avoid this, you should manage activities references. Add the name of the application in the manifest file:

<application
    android:name=".MyApp"
    ....
 </application>

Your application class :

  public class MyApp extends Application {
        public void onCreate() {
              super.onCreate();
        }

        private Activity mCurrentActivity = null;
        public Activity getCurrentActivity(){
              return mCurrentActivity;
        }
        public void setCurrentActivity(Activity mCurrentActivity){
              this.mCurrentActivity = mCurrentActivity;
        }
  }

Create a new Activity :

public class MyBaseActivity extends Activity {
    protected MyApp mMyApp;

    public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
        mMyApp = (MyApp)this.getApplicationContext();
    }
    protected void onResume() {
        super.onResume();
        mMyApp.setCurrentActivity(this);
    }
    protected void onPause() {
        clearReferences();
        super.onPause();
    }
    protected void onDestroy() {        
        clearReferences();
        super.onDestroy();
    }

    private void clearReferences(){
        Activity currActivity = mMyApp.getCurrentActivity();
        if (this.equals(currActivity))
            mMyApp.setCurrentActivity(null);
    }
}

So, now instead of extending Activity class for your activities, just extend MyBaseActivity. Now, you can get your current activity from application or Activity context like that :

Activity currentActivity = ((MyApp)context.getApplicationContext()).getCurrentActivity();
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3  
You could just use WeakReference and achieve the same result with less code. – Nacho Coloma May 26 '13 at 15:55
2  
@Nacho I would never recomment to use WeakReferences in Android the GC collectes them faster then you think. – rekire Jun 25 '13 at 10:46
4  
@MaximKorobov Yes it is possible if you call finish() from onCreate(), if you use your activity just to launch another activity and stops this one. In this scenario it skips onPause() and onStoo(). See the bottom note of: developer.android.com/training/basics/activity-lifecycle/… – Rodrigo Leitão Oct 30 '13 at 16:45
1  
@rekire @NachoColoma Use of WeakReference is not advised for caching, this is not caching, that is the mCurrentActivity will only have a reference to it when it's alive so the WeakReference will never be collected while the Activity is on top. However what @NachoColoma suggest is wrong because the WeakReference may still reference a non-resumed (not alive/not on top) activity if the variable is not cleared! – TWiStErRob Aug 13 '14 at 13:52
6  
Starting from Android API level 14 it should be possible to use Application .ActivityLifecycleCallbacks, which would be more central and you wouldn't have to add any management code in all your activities. Also see developer.android.com/reference/android/app/… – Filou Apr 14 '15 at 12:45

[[UPDATE]]

As pointed by @gezdy, and I'm grateful for that. set reference to null too for current activity, instead of updating on just every onResume set it to null on every Activity's onDestroy to avoid memory leak problem.

A while ago I needed the same functionality and here is the method how I achieved this. In your every activity override these life cycle methods.

@Override
protected void onResume() {
    super.onResume();
    appConstantsObj.setCurrentActivity(this);

}

@Override
protected void onPause() {
   clearReferences();
   super.onPause();
}

@Override
protected void onDestroy() {        
   clearReferences();
   super.onDestroy();
}

private void clearReferences(){
          Activity currActivity = appConstantsObj.getCurrentActivity();
          if (this.equals(currActivity))
                appConstantsObj.setCurrentActivity(null);
}

Now in your broadcast class you can access current activity to show alert on it.

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3  
This answer should really get more up-votes, simple solution, but powerful when you have classes that need to manipulate activities, but aren't activities themselves. – darkravedev Oct 2 '12 at 13:38
1  
Thank you. But seems @Deepali didn't have time to accept it though :). – waqas716 Oct 2 '12 at 14:53
    
@waqas716 : where should the class AppConsts be written???? – Deepzz Nov 24 '12 at 7:49
    
It's about just a static reference of your activity object. You can create it wherever you want :). It doesn't matter. – waqas716 Nov 24 '12 at 11:23
4  
@waqas716 I'd suggest to simplify the condition in clearReferences() to (this.equals(currActivity)). – naXa Jun 22 '14 at 3:32

I expand on the top of @gezdy's answer.

In every Activities, instead of having to "register" itself with Application with manual coding, we can make use of the following API since level 14, to help us achieve similar purpose with less manual coding.

public void registerActivityLifecycleCallbacks (Application.ActivityLifecycleCallbacks callback)

http://developer.android.com/reference/android/app/Application.html#registerActivityLifecycleCallbacks%28android.app.Application.ActivityLifecycleCallbacks%29

In Application.ActivityLifecycleCallbacks, you can get which Activity is "attached" to or "detached" to this Application.

However, this technique is only available since API level 14.

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What's up with all the other answers? Clearly this is designed API for this purpose. Thank you, Cheok Yan Cheng – Michael Bushe Jul 13 '15 at 22:46
    
@MichaelBushe - in 2012, when the other answers were written, depending on API level 14 was not something to rely on in every device, given that the API had only been recently released (Oct 2011). – ToolmakerSteve Oct 7 '15 at 23:58
2  
Found an answer showing how to use this approach: stackoverflow.com/a/11082332/199364 The benefit is that nothing need be done to the activities themselves; the code is all in your custom callback class. You simply make a class that implements Application.ActivityLifecycleCallbacks, and add the methods to implement that. Then in that class' constructor (or onCreate or init or other method that runs when instance is becoming active/ready), put getApplication().registerActivityLifecycleCallbacks(this); as the last line. – ToolmakerSteve Oct 8 '15 at 1:40

Having access to the current Activity is very handy. Wouldn’t it be nice to have a static getActivity method returning the current Activity with no unnecessary questions?

The Activity class is very useful. It gives access to the application’s UI thread, views, resources, and many more. Numerous methods require a Context, but how to get the pointer? Here are some ways:

  • Tracking the application’s state using overridden lifecycle methods. You have to store the current Activity in a static variable and you need access to the code of all Activities.
  • Tracking the application’s state using Instrumentation. Declare Instrumentation in the manifest, implement it and use its methods to track Activity changes. Passing an Activity pointer to methods and classes used in your Activities. Injecting the pointer using one of the code injection libraries. All of these approaches are rather inconvenient; fortunately, there is a much easier way to get the current Activity.
  • Seems like the system needs access to all Activities without the issues mentioned above. So, most likely there is a way to get Activities using only static calls. I spent a lot of time digging through the Android sources on grepcode.com, and I found what I was looking for. There is a class called ActivityThread. This class has access to all Activities and, what’s even better, has a static method for getting the current ActivityThread. There is only one little problem – the Activity list has package access.

Easy to solve using reflection:

public static Activity getActivity() {
    Class activityThreadClass = Class.forName("android.app.ActivityThread");
    Object activityThread = activityThreadClass.getMethod("currentActivityThread").invoke(null);
    Field activitiesField = activityThreadClass.getDeclaredField("mActivities");
    activitiesField.setAccessible(true);
    HashMap activities = (HashMap) activitiesField.get(activityThread);
    for (Object activityRecord : activities.values()) {
        Class activityRecordClass = activityRecord.getClass();
        Field pausedField = activityRecordClass.getDeclaredField("paused");
        pausedField.setAccessible(true);
        if (!pausedField.getBoolean(activityRecord)) {
            Field activityField = activityRecordClass.getDeclaredField("activity");
            activityField.setAccessible(true);
            Activity activity = (Activity) activityField.get(activityRecord);
            return activity;
        }
    }
}

Such a method can be used anywhere in the app and it’s much more convenient than all of the mentioned approaches. Moreover, it seems like it’s not as unsafe as it looks. It doesn’t introduce any new potential leaks or null pointers.

The above code snippet lacks exception handling and naively assumes that the first running Activity is the one we’re looking for. You might want to add some additional checks.

Blog Post

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in Kitkat and above mActivities is not HashMap, but ArrayMap, so you need to change this line: HashMap activities = (HashMap) activitiesField.get(activityThread); to look like this: ArrayMap activities = (ArrayMap) activitiesField.get(activityThread); – Palejandro Oct 19 '15 at 11:58
    
@Palejandro for support both api levels (above 18 and below) it should use Map interface instead HashMap or ArrayMap. I've edited @AZ_ answer. – Yuriy Kolbasinskiy Dec 23 '15 at 8:35

Knowing that ActivityManager manages Activity, so we can gain information from ActivityManager. We get the current foreground running Activity by

ActivityManager am = (ActivityManager)context.getSystemService(Context.ACTIVITY_SERVICE);
ComponentName cn = am.getRunningTasks(1).get(0).topActivity;
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3  
don't think so Martin, from SDK help of getRunningTasks "Note: this method is only intended for debugging and presenting task management user interfaces. This should never be used for core logic in an application" – ruhalde Jan 8 '13 at 20:21
3  
Apparently this only supports a limited subset of running tasks in Android 5 / Lollipop. – Sam Jan 3 '15 at 2:34
    
stackoverflow.com/a/28423385/185022 :) a better approach – AZ_ Feb 10 '15 at 3:18

The answer by waqas716 is good. I created a workaround for a specific case demanding less code and maintenance.

I found a specific work around [Ugly but efficient] by having a static method fetch a view from the activity I suspect to be in the foreground [you can iterate through all activities and check if you wish or get the activity name from martin's answer

ActivityManager am = (ActivityManager)context.getSystemService(Context.ACTIVITY_SERVICE);
ComponentName cn = am.getRunningTasks(1).get(0).topActivity; 
].

I then check if the view is not null and get the context via getContext().

View v = SuspectedActivity.get_view();

if(v != null)
{
    // an example for using this context for something not permissible in global application context. 
    v.getContext().startActivity(new Intent("rubberduck.com.activities.SomeOtherActivity"));
}
share|improve this answer
    
I am looking for similar issue here stackoverflow.com/questions/22788289/… how do we get "SuspectedActivity" ? Is this native API? – Stella Apr 2 '14 at 17:18
    
Sorry I'm working on a web python project and am not up to speed. – Rubber Duck Apr 3 '14 at 5:00
    
BUT from docs for getRunningTasks: "Note: this method is only intended for debugging and presenting task management user interfaces. This should never be used for core logic in an application, ..." in developer.android.com/reference/android/app/… – ToolmakerSteve Oct 7 '15 at 22:59

I don't like any of the other answers. The ActivityManager is not meant to be used for getting the current activity. Super classing and depending on onDestroy is also fragile and not the best design.

Honestly, the best I have came up with so far is just maintaining an enum in my Application, which gets set when an activity is created.

Another recommendation might be to just shy away from using multiple activities if possible. This can be done either with using fragments, or in my preference custom views.

share|improve this answer
    
an enum? How does that help locate the current foreground activity instance? – ToolmakerSteve Oct 7 '15 at 23:02
    
"Super classing and depending on onDestroy is also fragile" How is that fragile? – ToolmakerSteve Oct 8 '15 at 0:58

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