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Let's say I have these classes:

class A<T> {
  void set(T t) {}
}

class B<T> {
  T get() { return null; }
}

class C extends A<String> { }
class D extends B<String> { }

class E extends A<Long> { }
class F extends B<Long> { }

And these variables:

A<?> a1 = new C();
B<?> b1 = new D();

A<?> a2 = new E();
B<?> b2 = new F();

Can I do these somehow (with some magic?):

a1.set(b1.get());
a2.set(b2.get());
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

No. But you can do

A<String> a1 = new C();
B<String> b1 = new D();

A<Long> a2 = new E();
B<Long> b2 = new F();

a1.set(b1.get());
a2.set(b2.get());

A<?> means A of some class, but I don't know which one. So you can't call its set() method because the compiler doesn't know if the type of the argument matches with the actual generic type of A.

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You cannot because you have

A<?> a1 = new C();
B<?> b1 = new D();

is the same as

A<? extends Object> a1 = new C();
B<? extends Object> b1 = new D();

So the generic type of a is a wildcard or unknown. b1.get() is an Object, a1.set() takes an unknown subclass of Object.

A<String> a1 = new C();
B<String> b1 = new D();
a1.set(b1.get()); // is okay as the type is `String`
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I tried to experiment with A<Object> z = (A<Object>)a1; z.set(b1.get()) seems to work. Would this cause any problems? –  jaakko Jul 10 '12 at 11:00
    
Why use generics if you don't care about type safety? Doing that is basically the same as removing the generic type, and accepting any kind of Object as argument. –  JB Nizet Jul 10 '12 at 11:09
    
Well, that was kind of my question, if I could do it (safely) without type safety, sorry for being a little unclear. So, without type safety, I can do that the way I want. It's just that the existing API returns wildcards. –  jaakko Jul 10 '12 at 11:13

You want to transform 1 kind of object to another object. Try adapter pattern. Please check the wiki link for more inside to adapter pattern.

Create an Adapter class which transforms your Object B to Object A.

class MyAdapter
{


public static A adaptTo(B b)
{
//your code to transform B to A

}

}

Now when you want to transform B to A, simply call

A a = Adapter.adaptTo(b);
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1  
Where is the translation? b1.get() returns a String and a1.set() takes a String. –  Peter Lawrey Jul 10 '12 at 10:42
    
@PeterLawrey He has to implement that logic in adapter class method. –  Rajesh Rao Jul 10 '12 at 10:44
    
Why does he need to if the types are the same? –  Peter Lawrey Jul 10 '12 at 10:45
    
@PeterLawrey His types are not same. classes A and B are independent. He has not mentioned that types of both classes will be same at runtime. –  Rajesh Rao Jul 10 '12 at 10:48
    
"b1.get() returns a String and a1.set() takes a String." That is same enough for me (and the JVM) –  Peter Lawrey Jul 10 '12 at 10:52

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