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First, I'm relatively new to both js and jQuery, so I apologize in advance if this is a really stupid question. That said, here it is: I'm trying to create a cannon-like animation for a background that does a slow 'sweep-like' transition from one image to another. The biggest issue I've been running into is ensuring that; a. The increment counter is progressed and; b. Each 'slice' of the image completes its fadeOut before the next begins.

If there's an easy (or obvious) way of doing this, I'd love to hear it. I've been pulling my hair out for a while now trying to figure out why these (and other similar variations) aren't working.

HTML: img class="bg" (10 instances of this)

(function () {
  // --- Variation 1 ---

  function effect() {
    var i = 0,
    var current = $(".bg_1:eq(" + i + ")"),
      arrLength = $(".bg_1").length;
    while (i < arrLength) {
      current.fadeOut(1000, 0);
      i++;
    }

  }
  effect();

  // --- Variation 2 ---
  function effect() {
    var i = 0,
    var current = $(".bg_1:eq(" + i + ")"),
      arrLength = $(".bg_1").length;
    while (i < arrLength) {
      current.fadeOut(1000, 0, function () {
        i++;
      });
    }

  }
  effect();

})();

I think it may be a problem with the scope of the 'i' variable, or a conflict in jQuery at that depth of scope. Any possible solutions would be GREATLY appreciated!

Thanks.

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4 Answers 4

Without seeing your html, it's a bit hard to answer, but here's a general way to animate multiple elements in sequence:

(function _loop(idx) {
    var $elements = $('#wrapper .bg'), idx = idx % $elements.length;
    $elements.eq(idx).fadeIn('slow').delay(2500).fadeOut('slow', function () {
      _loop(idx + 1);
    });
}(0));​

demo: http://jsfiddle.net/UU5AM/

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Your solutions are animating all the pictures at once. You have to install a recursive chain of events to do this:

// initial count value declared outside the function to not reinitialize
var count = 0;
function effect() {
  // search the current image
  var current = $(".bg_1:eq(" + count + ")");
  // if there's an image, fade it out
  if (current.length) {
    current.fadeOut(1000, function() {
     // increment the count;
     count++;
     // call the function recursively
     effect();
    });
  }
}
// call the function
effect();

See it working with the JSFiddle here

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! This looks remarkably similar to something I tried earlier. I must've had the order mixed up. You're a champ. –  monners Jul 10 '12 at 11:47
    
You're welcome! I just updated the post with a js fiddle, so you can see it in action. –  Beat Richartz Jul 10 '12 at 11:50

You can use fadeOut's callback argument to provide it with a function which it will execute when the animation is completed. You can use this to raise the counter and (if necessary) animate the next element.

For example:

(function () {

  function effect() {
    var i = 0,
    var current = $(".bg_1:eq(" + i + ")"),
      arrLength = $(".bg_1").length;
    var animateNext = function() {
      current.fadeOut(1000, 0, function() {
        i++;
        if (i < arrLength) {
          animateNext();
        }
      });
    }
    animateNext();
  }

  effect();

})();

As you can see, we've stored a reusable function in animateNext. We call it at the end of effect the first time to start the string of animation. After that, each next animation is started from the callback in fadeOut.

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Your var current will always be the same

try this:

function effect() {
    var i = 0;
    var arrLength = $(".bg_1").length;
    while (i<arrLength) {
        $(".bg_1:eq(" + i + ")").fadeOut(1000, 0);
        i++;
    }

}
effect();

Only now it will run as fast as the while loop goes. That means it will fade everything out almost immediately. You might want to run a setTimeout function for as long as the fadeOut goes:

var i = 0;
setTimeout(function(){ 
    $(".bg_1:eq(" + i + ")").fadeOut(1000, 0);
    i++;
}, 1000);

And ofcourse you will need to reset it when it reaches the end.

Edit: Beat Richartz way, running the function again when the fadeOut is completed, is even better then the setTimeout.

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