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Referring to the following SE answer.

When writing

A = A ?? B;

it is the same as

if( null != A )
    A = A;
else
    A = B;

Does that mean that

if( null == A ) A = B;

would be preferred, performance wise?

Or can I assume that the compiler optimizes the code when the same object is in the ?? notation?

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Yea, the performance hit here is non existent. –  eandersson Jul 10 '12 at 11:49
2  
Write both versions, compile, use ILDasm or dotPeek to see if there are any difference in generated code. –  J0HN Jul 10 '12 at 11:50
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3 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Don't worry about the performance, it will be negligible.

If you are curious about it, write some code to test the performance using Stopwatch and see. I suspect you'll need to do a few million iterations to start seeing differences though.

You can also never assume about the implementation of things, they are liable to change in future - invalidating your assumptions.

My assumption is the performance difference is likely very, very small. I'd go for the null coalescing operator for readability personally, it is nice and condense and conveys the point well enough. I sometimes do it for lazy-load checking:

_lazyItem = _lazyItem ?? new LazyItem();
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My advice would be to inspect the IL (intermediate language) and compare the different results. You can then see exactly what each boils down to and decide what is more optimized. But as Adam said in his comment, you're most likely best to focus on readability/maintainability over performance in something so small.

EDIT: you can view the IL by using the ILDASM.exe that ships with visual studio and open your compiled assembly.

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I just tried this in C# - very quickly, so there could be an error in my method. I used the following code and determined that the second method took about 1.75 times longer than the first.
@Lockszmith: After the edit below, the ratio was 1.115 in favor of the 1st implementation

Even if they took the same time, I would personally use the language construct that is built in, as it expresses your intentions more clearly to any future compiler that may have more built-in optimizations.

@Lockszmith: I've edited the code to reflect the recommendations from the comments

var A = new object();
var B = new object();

var iterations = 1000000000;

var sw = new Stopwatch();
for (int i = 0; i < iterations; i++)
{   
    if( i == 1 ) sw.Start();
    if (A == null)
    {
        A = B;
    }
}
sw.Stop();
var first = sw.Elapsed;

sw.Reset();
for (int i = 0; i < iterations; i++)
{
    if( i == 1 ) sw.Start();
    A = A ?? B;
}
sw.Stop();
var second = sw.Elapsed;

first.Dump();
second.Dump();

(first.TotalMilliseconds / second.TotalMilliseconds).Dump("Ratio");
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1  
I've just realised that this means the built in language construct takes longer. This is surprising... maybe there is some other optimisation being performed on the code that makes the test unfair? –  Stephen Hewlett Jul 10 '12 at 12:07
1  
Not really, the ?? route does a null check and assignment every time whereas the A == null route simply does the null check and no assignment. Try a test where A needs assigning every time. Also, use Stopwatch as opposed to DateTime, it is more accurate. Plus you need to do at least one run to make sure the lot has been JIT'd before doing a timing run. –  Adam Houldsworth Jul 10 '12 at 12:17
    
Thank for the code, I've edited your answer to reflect the suggestions above, and run it in LINQpad, it's still favoring the 'long version', but as all mentioned, what counts here is readability - and your test proves it's negligible. –  Lockszmith Jul 10 '12 at 12:40
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