Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I wonder, why I always have to also specify the has_many :assignments association in both of the models in question when using :through? Is this DRY? Are there cases when I do not need to specify them, or when they differ? Thank you for explanation.

class Programmer < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :projects, :through => :assignments
  has_many :assignments # Why that?
end

class Project < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :programmers, :through => :assignments
  has_many :assignments # Why that?
end

class Assignment < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :project
  belongs_to :programmer
end

Update

It seems I wasn't clear enough that I'm talking about has_many :through! So the answers given to this point don't really fit my question. So again:

Why do I always need a has_many :assignments when I already have a has_many :projects, :through => :assignments? Shouldn't Rails just add has_many :assignments itself automatically?

share|improve this question
    
no, rails doesn't create the connection automatically. As I said on my answer, you need to understand the reason you cannot have a many-to-may relationship. The table between them (assignments) is solving the many-to-many problem. You can consider the :through => :assignments a favour rails is doing for you to facilitate things in your API. –  gabrielhilal Jul 10 '12 at 14:34
    
Thank you, I'm still not getting why Rails doesn't do this (Pseudo Code): if has_many has :through parameter, then add has_many <value of through parameter> association. –  Joshua Muheim Jul 10 '12 at 14:49
    
Doesn't matter which relationship definition you type in first in your class definition. At runtime, rails will look for the specification of that :through relationship. Rails is very good about simplifying your code through the use of conventions, but it doesn't make anything up on its own. –  railsdog Jul 10 '12 at 17:20

3 Answers 3

I think it is important to understand the below:

You have a many-to-many relationship between Programmer and Project. In order to solve this relationship you have added a junction model called Assignment.

Actually the table projects is not linked to the programmers, both are connected to assignments instead.

You could have something like this:

class Programmer < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :assignments
end

class Project < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :assignments
end

class Assignment < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :project
  belongs_to :programmer
end

However, you don't want to access the table assignments each time you want to find all projects related to a programmer. In order to facilitate this connection, you can create a direct link between Programmer and Project. So, you can say that a programmer has many projects through the table assignments.

The result is your current set up. Without this configuration you could not for example.

#find a programmer
@programmer = Programmer(1)  
#find all projects related to this programmer
@projects = @programmer.projects

On the above example you don't need to even remember that there is a table assignments between them.

Take a look here as well: http://guides.rubyonrails.org/association_basics.html#the-has_many-through-association

I hope it helps...

EDIT

I have included a diagram, so you can visualise what I am trying to explain.

The Project and Programmer are not directly linked. So, has_many :projects, :through => :assignments is a Rails feature to facilitate thinks for you. And NO, it doesn't replace the has_many :assignments, which is the real connection to the table assignments.

Furthermore, the :through => feature can be used in other circumstances as well.

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, this is a nice and detailed explanation. As written below, I was confused about this because Shoulda insists on both associations being present. I opened an issue on GitHub to ask the developer for the reason here. –  Joshua Muheim Jul 10 '12 at 12:39
    
I have updated my question, it's about has_many :through, not only has_many! Maybe you can update your answer accordingly. :) –  Joshua Muheim Jul 10 '12 at 14:06

The has many x through x line defines a relationship on its own. In your case it tells the Programmer model that a programmer has many projects and can find out about this relationship by looking at the assignment model. This doesn't specify a relationship with the assignment model in and of itself though. Hence why the second line is necessary.

share|improve this answer
    
This means, that I don't need the has_many association if I don't want to do stuff like my_programmer.assignments? But are there cases where I don't want this association to exist anyway? Wouldn't it be nicer to have it added automatically anyway? –  Joshua Muheim Jul 10 '12 at 12:00
    
Ok, after some research: According to Shoulda‌​, it absolutely is required! I tried it out myself, and yes, it doesn't work without both associations properly specified. So there's still the question: why doesn't Rails add the has_many :xxx (without :through) automatically? –  Joshua Muheim Jul 10 '12 at 14:09

If you want to be able to access the assignments (and it has useful data on it) from both a programmer and a project instance, then yes, you have to include that association in each.

BUT, it's not required - so, if you don't need to access assignments and it's really just a join table, then leave it out.

share|improve this answer
    
Okay, thank you. But it's interesting that Shoulda matchers in RSpec insists on an existing has_many relationship, otherwise a spec like it { should have_many(:userroles).through(:usergroup_userroles) } doesn't pass. Is Shoulda wrong, or too much opinionated then? –  Joshua Muheim Jul 10 '12 at 12:04
    
According to Shoulda‌​, it absolutely is required! I tried it out myself, and yes, it doesn't work without both associations properly specified. So there's still the question: why doesn't Rails add the has_many :xxx (without :through) automatically? –  Joshua Muheim Jul 10 '12 at 14:08

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.