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I have a employee table which has general employee information. Another User table with user information. Users can create employees.

When users create employee, user assign division, product, sub product and region to employees.

Users themselevs have access to particular division, product, sub product and region.

e.g. User A has access to Division D1, Product P1 (Region= Asia, America) , P2 (Region= Asia) , P3 (Region= Asia, America).

Division is a parent of Product. Each division can have many products.

When I say User A has access to Product P1 (Region= Asia, America), it means user A can add employees with product = P1 and region = Asia or america.

He can not add employee to any other region for product P1 or any other products itself.

If assuming User A has added 500 employees in db, another user B has added 500 another employees and so on.

How do I write an efficient query to get the employees which I have access to?

Please note that It may happen that another user with same access right as I have can add employees and I should be able to see those employees as well.

Below is the db schema I have.

        --------------------------------------------------------
    --  DDL for Table BI_DIVISION
    --------------------------------------------------------

      CREATE TABLE "HEADCOUNT_BI"."BI_DIVISION" 
       (    "DIVISION_ID" NUMBER(*,0) NOT NULL 
        "DIVISION_NAME" VARCHAR2(4000) 
       ) ;

    --------------------------------------------------------
    --  DDL for Table BI_PRODUCT
    --------------------------------------------------------

      CREATE TABLE "HEADCOUNT_BI"."BI_PRODUCT" 
       (    "PRODUCT_ID" NUMBER(*,0) NOT NULL , 
        "PRODUCT_NAME" VARCHAR2(4000), 
        "DIVISION_ID" NUMBER(*,0) 
       ) ;


    --------------------------------------------------------
    --  DDL for Table BI_SUB_PRODUCT
    --------------------------------------------------------

      CREATE TABLE "HEADCOUNT_BI"."BI_SUB_PRODUCT" 
       (    "SUB_PRODUCT_ID" NUMBER(*,0) NOT NULL, 
        "SUB_PRODUCT_NAME" VARCHAR2(4000), 
        "PRODUCT_ID" NUMBER(*,0), 
       ) ;


    --------------------------------------------------------
    --  DDL for Table BI_REGION
    --------------------------------------------------------

      CREATE TABLE "HEADCOUNT_BI"."BI_REGION" 
       (    "REGION_ID" NUMBER(*,0) NOT NULL, 
        "REGION_NAME" VARCHAR2(4000) NOT NULL ENABLE 
       ) ;


    --------------------------------------------------------
    --  DDL for Table BI_EMPLOYEE
    --------------------------------------------------------

      CREATE TABLE "HEADCOUNT_BI"."BI_EMPLOYEE" 
       (    "EMP_ID" NUMBER(*,0) NOT NULL , 
        "DIVISION_ID" NUMBER(*,0), 
        "PRODUCT_ID" NUMBER(*,0), 
        "SUB_PRODUCT_ID" NUMBER(*,0), 
        "REGION_ID" NUMBER(*,0) ,
        "CONFIDENTIAL" VARCHAR2(1) DEFAULT 'Y' 
       );


    --------------------------------------------------------
    --  DDL for Table BI_USER
    --------------------------------------------------------

      CREATE TABLE "HEADCOUNT_BI"."BI_USER" 
       (    "USER_ID" NUMBER(*,0) NOT NULL, 
        "FIRSTNAME" VARCHAR2(4000), 
        "LASTNAME" VARCHAR2(4000) 
       ) ;


    --------------------------------------------------------
    --  DDL for Table BI_USER_ACCESS
    --------------------------------------------------------

      CREATE TABLE "HEADCOUNT_BI"."BI_USER_ACCESS" 
       (    "USER_ACCESS_ID" NUMBER(*,0) NOT NULL, 
        "USER_ID" NUMBER(*,0), 
        "DIVISION_ID" NUMBER(*,0), 
        "PRODUCT_ID" NUMBER(*,0), 
        "SUB_PRODUCT_ID" NUMBER(*,0), 
        "REGION_ID" NUMBER(*,0), 
        "ACCESS_LEVEL" NUMBER(*,0), 
        "CONFIDENTIAL" VARCHAR2(1) DEFAULT 'Y' 
       ) ;

    Insert into BI_DIVISION (DIVISION_ID,DIVISION_NAME) values (1,'DIVISION 1');
    Insert into BI_DIVISION (DIVISION_ID,DIVISION_NAME) values (2,'DIVISION 2');

    Insert into BI_PRODUCT (PRODUCT_NAME,DIVISION_ID,PRODUCT_ID) values ('PRODUCT 1',1,1);
    Insert into BI_PRODUCT (PRODUCT_NAME,DIVISION_ID,PRODUCT_ID) values ('PRODUCT 2',1,2);
    Insert into BI_PRODUCT (PRODUCT_NAME,DIVISION_ID,PRODUCT_ID) values ('PRODUCT 3',2,3);
    Insert into BI_PRODUCT (PRODUCT_NAME,DIVISION_ID,PRODUCT_ID) values ('PRODUCT 4',2,4);

    Insert into BI_SUB_PRODUCT (SUB_PRODUCT_ID,SUB_PRODUCT_NAME,PRODUCT_ID) values (1,'SUB PRODUCT 1', 1);
    Insert into BI_SUB_PRODUCT (SUB_PRODUCT_ID,SUB_PRODUCT_NAME,PRODUCT_ID) values (2,'SUB PRODUCT 2', 1);
    Insert into BI_SUB_PRODUCT (SUB_PRODUCT_ID,SUB_PRODUCT_NAME,PRODUCT_ID) values (3,'SUB PRODUCT 3', 2);
    Insert into BI_SUB_PRODUCT (SUB_PRODUCT_ID,SUB_PRODUCT_NAME,PRODUCT_ID) values (4,'SUB PRODUCT 4', 2);
    Insert into BI_SUB_PRODUCT (SUB_PRODUCT_ID,SUB_PRODUCT_NAME,PRODUCT_ID) values (5,'SUB PRODUCT 5', 3);


    Insert into BI_REGION (REGION_ID,REGION_NAME) values (1,'Americas');
    Insert into BI_REGION (REGION_ID,REGION_NAME) values (2,'Asia');
    Insert into BI_REGION (REGION_ID,REGION_NAME) values (3,'Germany');
    Insert into BI_REGION (REGION_ID,REGION_NAME) values (4,'Japan');
    Insert into BI_REGION (REGION_ID,REGION_NAME) values (5,'Pacific');
    Insert into BI_REGION (REGION_ID,REGION_NAME) values (6,'ROE');
    Insert into BI_REGION (REGION_ID,REGION_NAME) values (7,'United Kingdom');

    Insert into BI_USER (USER_ID,FIRSTNAME,LASTNAME) values (1,'Adam,'Smith);
    Insert into BI_USER (USER_ID,FIRSTNAME,LASTNAME) values (2,'Steve','Jones');

    -- user with user id = 1 has access to division 1 , product 1 , sub product 1 in regons americas, asia, germany with ACCESS_LEVEL = write access (2) and also access to confidential data 
    Insert into BI_USER_ACCESS (USER_ACCESS_ID,USER_ID,DIVISION_ID,PRODUCT_ID,SUB_PRODUCT_ID,REGION_ID,ACCESS_LEVEL, CONFIDENTIAL) values (1,1,1,1,1,1,2,'Y');
    Insert into BI_USER_ACCESS (USER_ACCESS_ID,USER_ID,DIVISION_ID,PRODUCT_ID,SUB_PRODUCT_ID,REGION_ID,ACCESS_LEVEL, CONFIDENTIAL) values (1,1,1,1,1,2,2,'Y');
    Insert into BI_USER_ACCESS (USER_ACCESS_ID,USER_ID,DIVISION_ID,PRODUCT_ID,SUB_PRODUCT_ID,REGION_ID,ACCESS_LEVEL, CONFIDENTIAL) values (1,1,1,1,1,3,2,'Y');

    -- user with user id = 1 has access to division 1 , product 2 , sub product 4 in regons americas, asia, germany with ACCESS_LEVEL = write access (2) and also NO access to confidential data 
    Insert into BI_USER_ACCESS (USER_ACCESS_ID,USER_ID,DIVISION_ID,PRODUCT_ID,SUB_PRODUCT_ID,REGION_ID,ACCESS_LEVEL, CONFIDENTIAL) values (1,1,1,2,4,1,2,'N');
    Insert into BI_USER_ACCESS (USER_ACCESS_ID,USER_ID,DIVISION_ID,PRODUCT_ID,SUB_PRODUCT_ID,REGION_ID,ACCESS_LEVEL, CONFIDENTIAL) values (1,1,1,2,4,2,2,'N');
    Insert into BI_USER_ACCESS (USER_ACCESS_ID,USER_ID,DIVISION_ID,PRODUCT_ID,SUB_PRODUCT_ID,REGION_ID,ACCESS_LEVEL, CONFIDENTIAL) values (1,1,1,2,4,3,2,'N');

    -- employees in division 1 , product 1, sub product 1 and region americas and not confi.
    Insert into BI_EMPLOYEE (EMP_ID,DIVISION_ID,PRODUCT_ID,SUB_PRODUCT_ID,REGION_ID,CONFIDENTIAL) values (1,'1','1','1',1,'N');
    Insert into BI_EMPLOYEE (EMP_ID,DIVISION_ID,PRODUCT_ID,SUB_PRODUCT_ID,REGION_ID,CONFIDENTIAL) values (2,'1','1','1',1,'N');
    Insert into BI_EMPLOYEE (EMP_ID,DIVISION_ID,PRODUCT_ID,SUB_PRODUCT_ID,REGION_ID,CONFIDENTIAL) values (3,'1','1','1',2,'N');
    Insert into BI_EMPLOYEE (EMP_ID,DIVISION_ID,PRODUCT_ID,SUB_PRODUCT_ID,REGION_ID,CONFIDENTIAL) values (4,'1','1','1',2,'N');
    Insert into BI_EMPLOYEE (EMP_ID,DIVISION_ID,PRODUCT_ID,SUB_PRODUCT_ID,REGION_ID,CONFIDENTIAL) values (5,'1','1','1',7,'N');

    Insert into BI_EMPLOYEE (EMP_ID,DIVISION_ID,PRODUCT_ID,SUB_PRODUCT_ID,REGION_ID,CONFIDENTIAL) values (11,'1','1','2',1,'N');
    Insert into BI_EMPLOYEE (EMP_ID,DIVISION_ID,PRODUCT_ID,SUB_PRODUCT_ID,REGION_ID,CONFIDENTIAL) values (12,'1','1','2',2,'N');
    Insert into BI_EMPLOYEE (EMP_ID,DIVISION_ID,PRODUCT_ID,SUB_PRODUCT_ID,REGION_ID,CONFIDENTIAL) values (13,'1','1','2',3,'N');
    Insert into BI_EMPLOYEE (EMP_ID,DIVISION_ID,PRODUCT_ID,SUB_PRODUCT_ID,REGION_ID,CONFIDENTIAL) values (14,'1','1','2',2,'N');
    Insert into BI_EMPLOYEE (EMP_ID,DIVISION_ID,PRODUCT_ID,SUB_PRODUCT_ID,REGION_ID,CONFIDENTIAL) values (15,'1','1','2',3,'N');

    Insert into BI_EMPLOYEE (EMP_ID,DIVISION_ID,PRODUCT_ID,SUB_PRODUCT_ID,REGION_ID,CONFIDENTIAL) values (111,'2','3','5',1,'N');
    Insert into BI_EMPLOYEE (EMP_ID,DIVISION_ID,PRODUCT_ID,SUB_PRODUCT_ID,REGION_ID,CONFIDENTIAL) values (112,'2','3','5',2,'N');
    Insert into BI_EMPLOYEE (EMP_ID,DIVISION_ID,PRODUCT_ID,SUB_PRODUCT_ID,REGION_ID,CONFIDENTIAL) values (113,'2','3','5',3,'N');
    Insert into BI_EMPLOYEE (EMP_ID,DIVISION_ID,PRODUCT_ID,SUB_PRODUCT_ID,REGION_ID,CONFIDENTIAL) values (114,'2','3','5',4,'N');
    Insert into BI_EMPLOYEE (EMP_ID,DIVISION_ID,PRODUCT_ID,SUB_PRODUCT_ID,REGION_ID,CONFIDENTIAL) values (115,'2','3','5',5,'N');

and below is the query I have written so far but I am not sure if it is best way of doing it.

    SELECT 
  *
FROM 
  BI_EMPLOYEE e 
JOIN BI_USER_ACCESS uad On uad.DIVISION_ID = e.DIVISION_ID and uad.USER_ID = 137
JOIN BI_USER_ACCESS uap On uap.PRODUCT_ID = e.PRODUCT_ID and uap.USER_ID = 137
JOIN BI_USER_ACCESS uasp On uasp.SUB_PRODUCT_ID = e.SUB_PRODUCT_ID and uasp.USER_ID = 137
JOIN BI_USER_ACCESS uar On uar.REGION_ID = e.REGION_ID  and uar.SUB_PRODUCT_ID = e.SUB_PRODUCT_ID and uar.USER_ID = 137

EDIT 1 :

I have updated my question with the db script and some sample data.

share|improve this question
    
why close this question? –  anything Jul 10 '12 at 12:25
    
We're missing the BI_USER_ACCESS table. Could you also provide some sample data (INSERT...) and expected result. Also you may want to remove all columns not directly useful for the question. –  Vincent Malgrat Jul 10 '12 at 12:34
    
Vincent Malgrat Okay. Give me some time. Stuck in something else :( –  anything Jul 10 '12 at 12:37
    
@Vincent Malgrat. I have updated my question with the script. –  anything Jul 13 '12 at 5:46

3 Answers 3

The list of employees that a user can access would be given by a query like this:

SELECT * 
  FROM bi_employee e
 WHERE EXISTS (SELECT NULL
                 FROM bi_user_access ua
                WHERE ua.division_id = e.division_id
                  AND ua.product_id = e.product_id
                  AND ua.sub_product_id = e.sub_product_id
                  AND ua.region_id = e.region_id
                  AND (e.confidential = 'N' OR ua.confidential = 'Y')
                  AND ua.user_id = :user_id);

With your data sample user 1 has access to employees 1 to 4.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. But Do I really need to check for division and product as sub product is lowest level (division is parent of product and product is parent of sub product)? –  anything Jul 13 '12 at 8:50
1  
IF (1) sub_product_id is unique and (2) your index on bi_user_access is on sub_product_id THEN it's ok to check on subproduct_id only. –  Vincent Malgrat Jul 13 '12 at 9:56
    
sub_product_id is unique across all the products. I dont have any indexes though. –  anything Jul 17 '12 at 9:28
    
The columns division_id and product_id could be removed from the table bi_user_access since this data can already be found in the tables bi_product and bi_subproduct :) –  Vincent Malgrat Jul 17 '12 at 12:15

Your question specifically asks what is the fastest way to get the list of employees accessible by a user. So I'll answer that.

I used to work on a similar system a few years ago where it was critical we could evaluate this information extremely quickly. The principle was the same, but we had many more criteria (division, product, region, country, city, unit, department, etc.).

If performance is really critical, it is worth materialising the results of the query into a table e.g. ACL_CACHE(USER_ID, EMP_ID)

The query to get employees accessible by a user then becomes trivial:

SELECT EMP_ID
FROM ACL_CACHE
WHERE USER_ID = ####

You can also join the ACL_CACHE table into other queries if you want to limit the results a user can see based on their level of access.

This works extremely well, and brings substantial benefits when working with a large number of employees and/or users; we were typically working with ~500,000 records.

The downside is obviously that you need to keep the ACL_CACHE table up-to-date. This means that some other transactions can become a little bit slower. For example, when adding a new employee, you also need to add records to the ACL_CACHEtable for all users that can see the new employee.

In our experience, the extra delay on these kind of transactions isn't noticeable for the user and is well worth the sacrifice to have all read-only transactions work an order of magnitude faster.

Alternatively, you can update the ACL_CACHE table as a nightly job in one mass update, if you can put up with the data being up to 24 hours "old". Since your tables are called "HEADCOUNT_BI" I'm guessing it may be acceptable if your headcount reports are always accurate up to yesterday evening.

share|improve this answer

This query joins the USER_ACCESS table to the EMPLOYEE table. It's filtering the USER_ACCESS table on the supplied USER_ID (137), and then the join to EMPLOYEE will only return employees that have the same DIVISION_ID and PRODUCT_ID record as exists in the USER_ACCESS table.

select  e.*
from    BI_USER_ACCESS a
join    BI_EMPLOYEE e
on      a.DIVISION_ID = e.DIVISION_ID
and     a.PRODUCT_ID = e.PRODUCT_ID
where   a.USER_ID = 137

It only selects the EMPLOYEE data (e.*) but you could (say) join the USER_ACCESS table to the USER table and return user data too, if you needed. But to just return the EMPLOYEE data, based on the 2 fields in USER_ACCESS, that should do it.

Does that get you what you wanted?

share|improve this answer

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