Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I hope I'm making the question clear.

Say you have some check-boxes (or any other type of element for that matter) for which you register events handler when the page loads. Then you add some more check-boxes using AJAX (so no page reload). But you also want these newly added check-boxes (after the page was loaded) to have the same registered events handlers?

What I tried was this but I feel there has to be a better approach:

$(document).ready(function () {

  // Register custom envets handler
  registerCustomEventHandlers();

  $('a').on('click', addExtraFields);
});

function registerCustomEventHandlers() {
  $('input.class_name').on("change", sayHelloWorld);
}

function sayHelloWorld() {
  alert('Hello world');
}

function addExtraFields() {
  // insert some checkboxes...

  // register the events handler again for the newly added fields
  registerCustomEventHandlers();
}

So basically inside the function that adds the check-boxes I register again all the events handlers. I was looking at something like this $(document).change(function() {}); but apperently it is not supported by all browsers...

Any suggestions?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can delegate the event to the document instead so that they will be applied to all future inputs as well. You don’t even need to put it in a domReady event, since the document is always available:

$(document).on("change", "input.class_name", sayHelloWorld);

function sayHelloWorld() {
    alert('Hello world');
}

function addExtraFields() {
    // insert some checkboxes, they will have the same handler attached when inserted
}

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/gdX3R/1/

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the live example. It's exactly what I need and sorry for the late vote :) –  Max Sep 3 '12 at 9:13

I would recommend against using live selectors because of these reasons

Shortly summed up, it's a performance issue because it messes with every click event.

Instead, just use delegate like described in the post on lowest common parent element of the inputs (most likely a form):

$('#yourFormId').delegate('.class_name', 'click', function() { 
   // what you want to do
});

You can find a jsfiddle here

And don't use selectors like input.class_name (unless there elements other than input with that class name). They're slower than .class_name because they're looping through all the inputs in the form searching for elements with that class rather than just selecting by class.

share|improve this answer
    
I can only choose one best answer but I like this solution as well. So +1 from me. Thanks. –  Max Sep 3 '12 at 9:13

As of jquery 1.4 you can always use live() too http://api.jquery.com/live/ which allows you to attach handlers now and in the future to any matching elements.

share|improve this answer

the way this is done in Jquery is such that you don't need the object to be present when creating the handler.

You could use:

$(document.body).on("click", "input[type='checkbox']", 
   function(){alert($(this))}
);

This will be applied to any new check-box added to the page, no matter timing.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.